New Searchable War Memorials online

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News:

TheGenealogist has just released over 658 War Memorials with 75,973 new individuals. This means that there are now a total of over 568,000 individuals that are fully searchable in TheGenealogist’s War Memorial records.

Top left: The State War Memorial – Western Australia, Perth Kings Park Cenotaph; top right: Leicester Cathedral; bottom: One of over 1,000 memorial plaques from tree-lined avenues in Kings Park, Perth, Western Australia

 

The new data will allow the family history researcher to discover:

  • close to 76,000 individuals recorded on War Memorials
  • 658 War Memorials from England, Australia, New Zealand and Canada

 

These fully searchable records are transcribed from images of the tributes put up to honour the war dead from various conflicts including the Boer War, the First World War and World War II. This latest release from TheGenealogist covers war memorials from many parts of the UK, as well as some further afield monuments in Australia, Canada and New Zealand.

This new release covers memorials large and small. For example, there are over 3,100 names from the First World War commemorated in Middlesbrough, Teesside; while 527 names can be searched from Durham (covering both world wars); and another 1,655 individuals for Market Harborough in Leicestershire. You can discover that the roll of honour for the 59 men who were members of the congregation of St Nicholas church, in Durham, also records stars against the names of those who had been members of the 1st Durham Boy’s Brigade.

 

A number of school memorials, as well as those for places of work, are released including: The Haberdashers School – now in Hertfordshire; St Benedicts School, Glastonbury, Somerset; Takapuna School – in Auckland, New Zealand and Kohukohu school, also in New Zealand; King’s School in Bruton, Somerset; Monmouth Grammar School; Ightham School (Kent) WW1; Oving (West Sussex) school; London (Kensington) Lycee Francais WW2 – includes resistance fighters and some killed in concentration camps.

 

There are various business organisations who have honoured their dead employees with memorials. Some of those in this release include: Symingtons (corset makers) in Market Harborough, Leicestershire; Sevenoaks Postal District in Kent for their WW1 and WW2 deaths; the main colliery in Edlington, South Yorkshire; the London & Lancashire Insurance Company; the Phoenix Insurance Company; the Auckland (NZ) Harbour Board Staff; the Southern Co-operative WW1 and WW2 deaths from Portsmouth; Southdown Motor Services (Brighton Bus depot) WW2 deaths; Cox’s & Kings Bank (Army agents) from WW1 and WW2 and the London Stock Exchange – members and clerks for Boer War, WW1 and WW2.

 

In the Antipodes – the War Memorial in Auckland names all the men of New Zealand who were lost in the Boer War. While in Australia there are over 1,000 memorial plaques from tree-lined avenues in the park in Perth, Western Australia. Each memorial plaque in this park is dedicated to a particular man lost in WW1 or WW2 – some at Gallipoli, some on the Western Front, some fighting the Japanese as well as those who died when a POW in the Far East in WW2.

While from England, an unusual War Memorial is the WW1 roll of Honour for Leicestershire – the book is in a glass case in Leicester Cathedral and so is inaccessible. The names, however, are included in this release.

 

 

These records are available to Diamond subscribers of TheGenealogist as part of their large Military Records collection.

 

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TheGenealogist Enhances the Map Explorer

Powerful new map tool helps trace ancestors’ Headstones and War Memorials 

PRESS RELEASE FROM THEGENEALOGIST

(Disclosure: Please note this blog post contains affiliate links that help me pay for this website.*)

TheGenealogist’s latest innovation, launched at the end of last month to help you find an ancestor’s property and watch the landscape change over time, has now had its first powerful new features added. This is only the beginning, with several other enhancements coming soon.

 

Joining the georeferenced Lloyd George Data Layer are Headstones and War Memorials.

Map Explorer locates various War Memorials in an area

 

  • TheGenealogist’s Map Explorer displays maps for historical periods up to the modern day.
  • Cemeteries have now been added to the maps – enabling researchers to locate burial grounds and view Headstone images, transcripts and cemetery views.
  • War Memorial site locations are shown, with links to see photographs, transcripts and setting.

 

Once you have found an ancestor’s grave or memorial, you will now not only be able to see an image of it and read a transcript, but also understand exactly where it is in relation to towns, villages or cities on the historic or modern maps. This should make it easier for family historians to plan a visit to see where an ancestor is buried or commemorated.

 

TheGenealogist’s powerful Map Explorer has been developed to view these georeferenced historic maps overlaid on top of modern background maps including those from Ordnance Survey and Bing Street maps, as well as a satellite view. With the Map Explorer you can search for an ancestor’s property, discovering its site, even if the road has changed or is no longer there.

 

Alternatively, using the Master Search on TheGenealogist, having found your forebear listed on a War Memorial or graveyard, clicking through to the Map Explorer will show the War Memorial’s or the cemetery’s whereabouts on the various maps.

 

See our article Using the latest features of the Map Explorer, where we find T.E. Lawrence’s headstone and the whereabouts of the Graveyard in which he is buried, plus Wilfred Owen’s War Memorial in his local church. (Disclosure: Please note this blog post contains affiliate links that help me pay for this website.*)

 

 

 

About TheGenealogist

 

TheGenealogist is an award-winning online family history website, who put a wealth of information at the fingertips of family historians. Their approach is to bring hard to use physical records to life online with easy to use interfaces such as their Tithe and newly released Lloyd George Domesday collections.

 

TheGenealogist’s innovative SmartSearch technology links records together to help you find your ancestors more easily. TheGenealogist is one of the leading providers of online family history records. Along with the standard Birth, Marriage, Death and Census records, they also have significant collections of Parish and Nonconformist records, PCC Will Records, Irish Records, Military records, Occupations, Newspaper record collections amongst many others.

 

TheGenealogist uses the latest technology to help you bring your family history to life. Use TheGenealogist to find your ancestors today!

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TheGenealogist’s new release commemorates the centenary of the ending of the First World War

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I went to the cenotaph in my town today and stood in silence for two minutes with the nation. Sad  thinking about the loss of life in every war.

Lest we forget.

 

Latest news:

To mark the end of World War 1 that came to a close on 11 November 1918 with the signing of the armistice, TheGenealogist has just released over 42,000 records of Officers that died in the Great War, along with additional Rolls of Honour and over 30,000 War Memorials, War Graves plans, maps and listings.

Armistice day
Armistice day

 

These fully searchable records join an already strong WW1 Collection on the site, providing a highly useful resource for those seeking their ancestors caught up in the conflict.

 

This new release will allow researchers to:

 

  • Discover Officers who gave their lives in the First World War
  • View images of the HMSO’s Officers Died in the Great War Part I & II 1914-1918
  • Find an officer’s rank, cause of death, date of death and regiment.
  • Look for names commemorated in Rolls of Honour and War Memorials
  • See War Graves plans, maps and listings

 

Family history researchers with ancestors who fought in the First World War will welcome these fascinating new releases that add to TheGenealogist’s well received collection of World War 1 records.

 

“TheGenealogist has got itself a very interesting collection of niche records that can really help you unlock the story of a soldier.”

Chris Baker from The Long, Long Trail website and www.fourteeneighteen.co.uk

 

Subscribers to TheGenealogist’s Diamond subscription can search 5.4 million Medal Records; 2.4 million Casualty Lists including Wounded, Missing and PoWs; 666,000 Muster & Pay Book records; 624,000 Soldiers died in the Great War; 506,000 War Memorials; 227,000 Roll of Honour transcripts; and Mentioned in Dispatches records.

 

In addition members can search and view Newspapers from the period (Illustrated War News, The Sphere, War Illustrated, Illustrated London News, The B.E.F. TIMES with which are incorporated The Wipers Times, The “New Church” Times, The Kemmel Times & The Somme Times.)

 

TheGenealogist’s subscribers also have access to WW1 Stereoviews, Army, Navy and Air Force Lists, Defence Staff Lists and many Regimental Histories.

 

Read TheGenealogist’s article on Finding Officers that died in the Great War

 

 

About TheGenealogist

 

TheGenealogist is an award-winning online family history website, who put a wealth of information at the fingertips of family historians. Their approach is to bring hard to use physical records to life online with easy to use interfaces such as their Tithe and newly released Lloyd George Domesday collections.

 

TheGenealogist’s innovative SmartSearch technology links records together to help you find your ancestors more easily. TheGenealogist is one of the leading providers of online family history records. Along with the standard Birth, Marriage, Death and Census records, they also have significant collections of Parish and Nonconformist records, PCC Will Records, Irish Records, Military records, Occupations, Newspaper record collections amongst many others.

 

TheGenealogist uses the latest technology to help you bring your family history to life. Use TheGenealogist to find your ancestors today!

 
 

 

*Disclosure: Please note this post contains affiliate links. This does not mean that you pay more just that I make a percentage on the sales from my links. The payments help me pay for the cost of running the site. You may like to read this explanation here:

http://paidforadvertising.co.uk

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TheGenealogist launches the First World War issues of The Sphere newspaper and more War Memorials

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Press Release:

TheGenealogist has expanded its Newspaper and Magazine collection with the release of The Sphere that cover August 1914 to June 1919.

Using the Historical newspapers and magazines resource on TheGenealogist enables researchers to follow current affairs that may have affected or concerned our ancestors at the time. Because the articles were written as events were occurring, they provide contemporary accounts of the world that our ancestors lived in and can furnish us with great insights into opinions of the time. In the case of the First World War years, covered by this release of The Sphere, we can gain information about individuals or read about situations that are similar to ones that our ancestors may have found themselves in.

The Sphere on TheGenealogist

The Sphere was an illustrated paper founded by Clement Shorter (1857-1926) who was also responsible for establishing the Tatler and it covered general news stories from the UK and around the world.

 

War Memorials collection

Also being released at this time by TheGenealogist are another 116 War Memorials containing 10,795 names. Included in this batch are a number of Boer War memorials as well as those for the First World War. With this addition the total figure for memorials on

TheGenealogist has now reached 1,540 with 363,838 names.

 

To search these and many other records on TheGenealogist, go to: www.thegenealogist.co.uk

 

 

The Sphere, providing insights into your ancestor’s lives.

I wrote this piece for TheGenealogist to show how I used the Newspaper and Magazines collection to better understand conditions in World War I.

The Sphere 1914 on TheGenealogist

The Sphere December 12 1914 

 

 

I have been looking a little closer into the war exploits of my step-grandfather. I knew that he had joined the Royal Engineers Special Reserve Motor Cyclist Division as a despatch rider but, like many of his generation that fought in the First World War, he didn’t talk much about his experiences. What I did know was that he had found it ‘quite exciting’ to ride his despatches from headquarters to the front and back on a motorbike. He never expanded on this and certainly didn’t tell us stories about his escapades, nor what it was like to be a soldier on two wheels.

 

With the recent release of copies of The Sphere, on TheGenealogist, I was thus fascinated to come across the December 12 1914 edition of the publication. Here was an article about motorcycle despatch riders from the early part of the war. This day’s publication featured a double page evocative image of a motor-cycle despatch rider on his machine fleeing with the enemy on his tail. As I knew that my step-grandfather was in his late twenties at the time and a keen motorcycle rider I could imagine him reading pieces such as this and wanting to join up to the R.E. Motor Cyclists to ‘do his bit’.

 

I know that Grandpa also served in the western theatre of war and so this image and the report that followed, resonated with me. I could now imagine him in similar situations as had been described and pictured in the newspaper. In this particular article from the newly released records, the rider telling his story suffers a whole lot of problems: ‘On returning I take the wrong road and my machine gives trouble, and whilst repairing same I suddenly find myself surrounded by Uhlans.’ This narrator is captured, has his hands bound behind his back and he feigns illness. When his guard goes to fetch a doctor the British Tommy escapes by rolling into a ditch. This episode makes me realise that when my step-grandfather said it was ‘quite exciting’ this was probably a bit of an understatement. Their duties were certainly not a simple ride in the countryside.

The Sphere 12 Dec 1914
The Sphere 12 Dec 1914

 

 

The British Army in World War I would often used Douglas or Triumph Motorcycles for despatch riding duties which only had between 2 and 5 hp engines. Some riders, however, brought their own machines along when they joined up. These motorbikes would have to be inspected by the military to make sure that they were suitable for the purpose; but in the early days, when many of the men were volunteers, this would have meant that this section of the Royal Engineers Signals would have been up and running quickly. In my step-grandfather’s case, however, looking at his attestation papers I can see that this part had been scored through –  indicating that he would have had to be issued with an army bike.

 

Later in the First World War Grandpa was wounded and by reading other articles, such as that published on the 9th January 1915 about the RAMC work at the front, I got an understanding for how injured men were transferred in motorised omnibuses and ambulances that were also subject to breakdowns of their own.

 

Resources such as The Sphere, The War Illustrated, The Great War, The Illustrated London News, plus the other historical newspapers and magazines already found on TheGenealogist are great for building a picture of situations that our ancestors may have found themselves in. In some cases we may be lucky enough to find an ancestor actually named in a report – but even when that doesn’t happen we can find write-ups that provide us with an understanding of the wider conditions in which our ancestors worked, played or went to war in.

 

Another use that we can make of this resource is where we have an ancestor who was unfortunate enough to have lost their lives, while serving as an officer in the First World War.  In many editions of The Sphere Rolls of Honour were published. In these we are able to find a picture along with a few lines recording their loss. The Newspaper and Magazine collection is available to all Diamond subscribers of TheGenealogist.

Click here to find out more:

www.thegenealogist.co.uk

 

 

 

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Mark Herber’s collection of war memorial photos online

 

This announcement came out this week about a new website for family historians. One of the people behind it is Mark Herber, best known in the genealogy field for his very comprehensive book Ancestral Trails that was published, I think, in 1997 when I was still managing a bookshop.

 

War-Memorial.co.uk, is the brand new website dedicated to Photographing, Transcribing and preserving war memorial records for the future, has just launched online providing a unique service that allows the researcher to find their ancestor using the largest collection of combined War Memorial records and images currently available anywhere.

war-memorial-5-sm

This project is based on Mark Herber’s growing collection of war memorial photographs and personally checked transcriptions. It honours those men and women, who died or served our country in military conflict over the years and it already features over 20,000 detailed photographs of more than 1,200 memorials, commemorating over 270,000 people, with their names (and the memorial’s information about them) transcribed and indexed.

With regular additions of photographs, names and information to War-Memorial.co.uk expected as the months go by, War-Memorial.co.uk is the place to find your ancestors immortalised on the country’s war memorials.

Details that can be found in these memorial records include:

  • Name
  • Regiment, unit or ship
  • War or date of death
  • Rank and medals
  • Photograph of the War Memorial from multiple angles and zooms

War-Memorial.co.uk’s collection includes a very large number of records from the Boer War of 1899-1902 and WW1 and WW2, but it also includes memorials from as early as the 17th century up to very recent conflicts such as Northern Ireland and Afghanistan. Soldiers, sailors, aircrew and civilians are all featured – and not just those who died. Many men and women who served but survived also appear in the records.

Using the sophisticated search technology and just basic details you can locate full information on War Memorials on which men and women are commemorated, find more details about them (such as their regiments, ships, ranks and medals), discover the location of the War Memorial and see images of the memorial itself and a close up view of the name of your ancestor!

War-Memorial.co.uk is offering some great value options to suit every pocket starting at £5 for a month’s access, £9.95 quarterly, or take out a great value annual subscription at only £29.95.

With regular additions of photographs, names and information to War-Memorial.co.uk expected as the months go by. War-Memorial.co.uk is the place to find your ancestors immortalised on the country’s war memorials.

Example of finding your ancestor in the records

Here we find the unusual records of a Thomas Ambrose, who was killed in 1916 by a bomb from a German airship flying over Sudbury. The transcribed record details how he died and where he is commemorated, as shown below:

war-memorial-search

Each transcript brings up details of the memorial with overview images of the entire memorial so you can find your ancestor using just their name, locate their memorial and add the images and information to your family history records, or even plan your visit!

war-memorial

Click here to find out more: http://war-memorial.co.uk/

 


 

 

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Murderous Madam and the Policeman

George Le Cronier's Memorial, Green Street, St.Helier.

I’ve been having a look at the S&N newsletter, that popped into my email box at the end of the week.

What caught my eye was a fascinating Victorian murder story that took place in the St Helier streets quite local to where I live. I’ve come across it before in the book The Policeman and the Brothel by Theodore Dalrymple, but this is the first time that I’ve seen it written from the family history records point of view!

It was fascinating to see the Illustrated London News report from March 7th 1846; the census records, with the tell tale blanks for the occupations of the young  prostitutes, and the criminal records showing the killer was transported for life to Van Diemens land. Also to be seen is the huge monument for the murdered policeman in Green Street cemetery, a picture of which can be searched for in TheGenealogist’s growing Volunteer Headstone Database that now includes many Jersey burials.

 

The newsletter isn’t just about this story. They begin with a look at what will be coming online from their group throughout 2015:

Parish Records, detailed County and Tithe Maps, millions of new Medals Records, more Grave Memorials from the Volunteer Headstone Project, records of Railway Workers from Pensions to Staff Movements, Jewish records, detailed Street Maps, Passenger Lists, Emigration Records and more War Memorials are all going online at TheGenealogist this year.

And then we hear that this month they’ve released more War Memorials, Parish Records and have now added the 1911 census for all Starter and Gold Subscribers! You can make the most of this with £30 cash back on an Annual Gold Subscription, making it just £48.95 for the first year!

There’s no better way, they suggest, to start the new year than with some special offers – you can claim £50 cashback on a Diamond Subscription to TheGenealogist, and save £££s in their New Year Sale over at S&N Genealogy Supplies. The news letter also takes a look at 2014 in a review.

Finally, there is that interesting article I’ve already drawn you attention to above about Ancestors that fell foul of the law. As the S&N team write in the email, these are always fascinating subjects for family history research and I would say none more than a Victorian murder story of a notorious Madam who escaped the hangman’s noose!

 

The Genealogist - UK census, BMDs and more online

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TheGenealogist adds more records and also some help videos

 

All in one search for family history

Soldiers Who Died in the First World War added to TheGenealogist

WW 1 RecordsAs the anniversary of the beginning of World War I took place recently many new databases have made it online to help us search for our brave ancestors. One such release is from TheGenealogist and is the Soldiers Who Died in this war.

This detailed record set covers over 650,000 individuals who died in the First World War. Details include name, rank, regiment, place of birth, place of residence, place of enlistment, service number and the cause, date and place of death. These records are uniquely linked to the Commonwealth War Graves Commission to show you where your ancestor is commemorated.

Soldiers Who Died in the Great War has been added to the huge military collection on TheGenealogist, encompassing many unique record sets from Casualty Lists and War Memorials,  to Rolls of Honour and more.

This site is family owned and seems to have a very friendly feel to it. At a time when others are being accused of not listening I have found that the team at TheGenealogist responded rapidly to any glitches I have had with the interface in the past. Indeed one such problem I had a few months back was fixed in minutes!

Now TheGenealogist has added some helpful videos to its website that show rather than tell users how to get the best from it. If you haven’t given them a try then I urge you to do so by seeing what TheGenealogist has to offer here.

The Genealogist - UK census, BMDs and more online

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650,000 World War One Military Records

All in one search for family historyI got a piece from the team at TheGenealogist today.

It tells of their most recent release of World War I records and the unique nature of the launch that links records of Soldiers who died in the First World War to their war graves.

These War Office records give full details about a soldier and are linked to where they are buried or commemorated on a memorial.

 

For the first time it is now possible to find the death record of an ancestor who fought and died in the First World War and with one further mouse-click, discover where they are buried or commemorated through a unique link to the Commonwealth War Graves Commission website which provides colour images and details on the War Cemetery including exact location, brief history of the regiments involved and the battles fought.

 

In a matter of seconds it is possible to trace an ancestor and gain an idea of the history of the battle or military importance of the location of where they fell. It really helps speed up your military research.

 

From 16 year old Private John Parr, who was the first British soldier to be killed in action on the 21st August 1914 on a patrol north east of Mons, to the last British soldier to die, Private George Edwin Ellison, who fought in most of the major World War One battles only to be killed an hour and a half before the Armistice on 11 November 1918 on patrol on the outskirts of Mons. Both John Parr and George Ellison are buried facing each other at the St Symphorien Military Cemetery having fought and died in ironically the same area of the Western Front, only four years apart emphasising the stalemate of the First World War.

 

The records link through to TheGenealogist’s other unique military records such as Prisoner of War records, casualty lists and war memorials. For instance you can find the record of Harry Topliffe within this new record set, showing us he enlisted with the Duke of Cambridge’s Own (Middlesex Regiment) and was living in Stamford Brook, Middlesex.

 

Harry was posted to Mesopotamia to fight the Turkish Army. A Prisoner of War record shows that he was imprisoned in Kut-El-Amara and a casualty list record shows that he died there, as a Prisoner. Harry is also listed in TheGenealogist’s War Memorial records, on a memorial within the Harrod’s store in London (he was an employee within the removals department). TheGenealogist then uniquely links to the Commonwealth War Graves Commission to show that he was buried in the Baghdad North Gate War Cemetery.

 

The 650,000 records of the soldiers who died in the First World War provide full details of the serviceman, including full name, where they were born, place of residence, place of enlistment, their rank and service number, cause and date of death and the regiment they served with.

 

Mark Bayley, Head of Online Content at TheGenealogist.co.uk, comments: “This latest release adds to our unique military collection. These records are great for those looking into what happened to their ancestor in the First World War. With the direct link from the soldiers who died on to the various other collections we hold, along with a link to where they are commemorated, one click gives you the story behind your ancestor’s military history.”

The Genealogist - UK census, BMDs and more online

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Military Records in Family Tree Research

With Remembrance Sunday just passed yesterday, I guess many of you may have turned your minds, like I did, to where can we find our ancestors who fought in the wars and conflicts that have taken place.

It seems, rather sadly, that it is easier to find records for British service personnel that died in action than the survivors. There is the Commonwealth War Graves Commission, local war memorials and rolls of honour, local newspaper archives amongst other places to find “The Glorious Dead”.

If, like me, you had a father who served in the Merchant Navy in the Second World War, then you can find the details of merchant seamen’s medal cards at the National Archives documents online.

http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/documentsonline/seamens-medals.asp

The official journals of the the British Government, the London, Edinburgh and Belfast Gazettes are great places to start looking for promotions, awards of gallantry medals and honours and the details of the commissioning and promotions of officers in the British Army, Royal Navy and Royal Air Force.

Service Records are more difficult to find. A large number of WWI records have been lost to bombing in the Second World War, but as officer’s records were not stored in the same place, you have a better chance of uncovering these. To find a soldier requires the researcher to know the regiment and service number of their ancestor. A tip I read in the Your Family Tree Magazine last month  (Issue 96 November 2010) was that as most service men were awarded at least one medal then the name indexes to the medal rolls are a good place to start researching.


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