TheGenealogist’s new release commemorates the centenary of the ending of the First World War

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I went to the cenotaph in my town today and stood in silence for two minutes with the nation. Sad  thinking about the loss of life in every war.

Lest we forget.

 

Latest news:

To mark the end of World War 1 that came to a close on 11 November 1918 with the signing of the armistice, TheGenealogist has just released over 42,000 records of Officers that died in the Great War, along with additional Rolls of Honour and over 30,000 War Memorials, War Graves plans, maps and listings.

Armistice day
Armistice day

 

These fully searchable records join an already strong WW1 Collection on the site, providing a highly useful resource for those seeking their ancestors caught up in the conflict.

 

This new release will allow researchers to:

 

  • Discover Officers who gave their lives in the First World War
  • View images of the HMSO’s Officers Died in the Great War Part I & II 1914-1918
  • Find an officer’s rank, cause of death, date of death and regiment.
  • Look for names commemorated in Rolls of Honour and War Memorials
  • See War Graves plans, maps and listings

 

Family history researchers with ancestors who fought in the First World War will welcome these fascinating new releases that add to TheGenealogist’s well received collection of World War 1 records.

 

“TheGenealogist has got itself a very interesting collection of niche records that can really help you unlock the story of a soldier.”

Chris Baker from The Long, Long Trail website and www.fourteeneighteen.co.uk

 

Subscribers to TheGenealogist’s Diamond subscription can search 5.4 million Medal Records; 2.4 million Casualty Lists including Wounded, Missing and PoWs; 666,000 Muster & Pay Book records; 624,000 Soldiers died in the Great War; 506,000 War Memorials; 227,000 Roll of Honour transcripts; and Mentioned in Dispatches records.

 

In addition members can search and view Newspapers from the period (Illustrated War News, The Sphere, War Illustrated, Illustrated London News, The B.E.F. TIMES with which are incorporated The Wipers Times, The “New Church” Times, The Kemmel Times & The Somme Times.)

 

TheGenealogist’s subscribers also have access to WW1 Stereoviews, Army, Navy and Air Force Lists, Defence Staff Lists and many Regimental Histories.

 

Read TheGenealogist’s article on Finding Officers that died in the Great War

 

 

About TheGenealogist

 

TheGenealogist is an award-winning online family history website, who put a wealth of information at the fingertips of family historians. Their approach is to bring hard to use physical records to life online with easy to use interfaces such as their Tithe and newly released Lloyd George Domesday collections.

 

TheGenealogist’s innovative SmartSearch technology links records together to help you find your ancestors more easily. TheGenealogist is one of the leading providers of online family history records. Along with the standard Birth, Marriage, Death and Census records, they also have significant collections of Parish and Nonconformist records, PCC Will Records, Irish Records, Military records, Occupations, Newspaper record collections amongst many others.

 

TheGenealogist uses the latest technology to help you bring your family history to life. Use TheGenealogist to find your ancestors today!

 
 

 

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TheGenealogist adds more records and also some help videos

 

All in one search for family history

Soldiers Who Died in the First World War added to TheGenealogist

WW 1 RecordsAs the anniversary of the beginning of World War I took place recently many new databases have made it online to help us search for our brave ancestors. One such release is from TheGenealogist and is the Soldiers Who Died in this war.

This detailed record set covers over 650,000 individuals who died in the First World War. Details include name, rank, regiment, place of birth, place of residence, place of enlistment, service number and the cause, date and place of death. These records are uniquely linked to the Commonwealth War Graves Commission to show you where your ancestor is commemorated.

Soldiers Who Died in the Great War has been added to the huge military collection on TheGenealogist, encompassing many unique record sets from Casualty Lists and War Memorials,  to Rolls of Honour and more.

This site is family owned and seems to have a very friendly feel to it. At a time when others are being accused of not listening I have found that the team at TheGenealogist responded rapidly to any glitches I have had with the interface in the past. Indeed one such problem I had a few months back was fixed in minutes!

Now TheGenealogist has added some helpful videos to its website that show rather than tell users how to get the best from it. If you haven’t given them a try then I urge you to do so by seeing what TheGenealogist has to offer here.

The Genealogist - UK census, BMDs and more online

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Military Records in Family Tree Research

With Remembrance Sunday just passed yesterday, I guess many of you may have turned your minds, like I did, to where can we find our ancestors who fought in the wars and conflicts that have taken place.

It seems, rather sadly, that it is easier to find records for British service personnel that died in action than the survivors. There is the Commonwealth War Graves Commission, local war memorials and rolls of honour, local newspaper archives amongst other places to find “The Glorious Dead”.

If, like me, you had a father who served in the Merchant Navy in the Second World War, then you can find the details of merchant seamen’s medal cards at the National Archives documents online.

http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/documentsonline/seamens-medals.asp

The official journals of the the British Government, the London, Edinburgh and Belfast Gazettes are great places to start looking for promotions, awards of gallantry medals and honours and the details of the commissioning and promotions of officers in the British Army, Royal Navy and Royal Air Force.

Service Records are more difficult to find. A large number of WWI records have been lost to bombing in the Second World War, but as officer’s records were not stored in the same place, you have a better chance of uncovering these. To find a soldier requires the researcher to know the regiment and service number of their ancestor. A tip I read in the Your Family Tree Magazine last month  (Issue 96 November 2010) was that as most service men were awarded at least one medal then the name indexes to the medal rolls are a good place to start researching.


Disclosure: Compensated Affiliate.

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