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Jan 27 19

Prisoner Records reveal a criminal lunatic who threatened Queen Victoria

by Nick Thorne, The Nosey Genealogist

Disclosure: Please note this post contains affiliate links.*

 
Latest News: 
TheGenealogist is adding to its Court and Criminal Records collection with the release of almost 700,000 entries for prisoners. Sourced from the HO 8 Registers held by The National Archives, these documents contain records from the years 1821 to 1876. This expands our collection to over 1.3 million individuals covering 1801-1876.

Central Criminal Court, Old Bailey

 
These Prison Registers give family history researchers details of ancestors who were imprisoned in a number of convict prisons from Broadmoor to the Warrior Convict Hulk. The records reveal the names of prisoners, offences the prisoner had been convicted for, the date of their trial and where they were tried.  

Use the quarterly prison registers to:
  • Find ancestors guilty of crimes ranging from theft, highway robbery and libel to murder
  • Discover the sentences received
  • See the age of a prisoner
  • Find out where they were sentenced and to which prison they were sent
  Read TheGenealogist’s article, “A child poisoner and a criminal lunatic detained at Her Majesty’s pleasure”.

*Disclosure: Please note this post contains affiliate links. This does not mean that you pay more just that I make a percentage on the sales from my links. The payments help me pay for the cost of running the site. You may like to read this explanation here: http://paidforadvertising.co.uk
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Jan 20 19

Those aren’t my ancestors

by Nick Thorne, The Nosey Genealogist

Break Down Your Family History Brick Walls

We all love it when we have identified a new ancestor and can then add them to our family tree to fill that annoying gap that once blighted our research. The sense of satisfaction to jump back one more generation can sometimes blind us, if only for a second. Unfortunately it can be for longer!

All to often we can be lead down the wrong path by spotting a person with the same name as the one we are seeking. By adding this likely person into our family tree, and then researching back from them, we have effectively grafted on to our own tree a branch of someone else’s which has no real right to be there.

I almost got caught out with one of my own ancestors who was responsible for a long standing brick wall of mine. I had already identified the marriage of this individual in a Plymouth church in 1794. From the parish register entry I had her name and that she was “of this parish”. Naturally I hoped that I could find her baptism and then the marriage of her parents and so go back through the generations in the city. Sadly, in this instance, when she declared she was of the parish it meant little more than that she was living there at the time. In a place, such as Plymouth, we have to be aware that such a conurbation would have attracted people in from the surrounding towns and countryside, as well as by sea.

 

Nick Thorne 'The Nosey Genealogist' researching for FamilyHistoryResearcher.com

 

I worked out a possible birth range from her marriage and searched Plymouth with no joy. I then widened the search to the whole of the county and was rewarded with a person with the correct name being born in North Devon. At this point I experienced the rush associated with the belief that I was on her trail! Unfortunately, by checking for marriages in the area, I found that this woman married someone else a year after my own ancestor with the same name married in Plymouth.

 

The fact that our ancestors were happy to chose from a small pool of forenames makes family history research harder and so anything that can make things easier for us should be welcomed. Or should it?

I am referring to the temptation to take a suggestion from an online family tree, or these days the clever matching software that online data websites boast, and simply click to add the suggested person to our tree without checking the evidence backs us up. Some people say that we should aim to find two or more sources as evidence for a particular fact. I read that Else Churchill of the Society of Genealogist has said that she believes that it’s the quality not quantity of your evidence that counts. This I think is very sound advice. So look at the facts and decide how much weight you truly can give to it before adding it to your family tree.

 

To learn more about tracing your English or Welsh family History you may be interested in my online course:

www.FamilyHistoryResearcher.com/course

 

www.familyhistoryresearcher.com

 

www.FamilyHistoryResearcher.com/course

 

 

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Jan 13 19

More than 144,700 Worcestershire Baptism records added to TheGenealogist and a further 20,000 individuals on Headstones

by Nick Thorne, The Nosey Genealogist

Disclosure: Please note this post contains affiliate links.*

Latest News

TheGenealogist is releasing the records of 144,793 individuals added to their Worcestershire Baptisms (in Partnership with Malvern FHS) and an additional 20,000 individuals on headstones from the UKIndexer project where volunteers help their fellow genealogists by indexing and/or photographing the monumental inscriptions in churchyards and cemeteries.

 

  • Discover dates of ancestors’ baptisms
  • Glean names of parents of those baptised in Worcestershire
  • Headstones give dates and name details of those buried and sometimes familiar relationships
  • Memorials can reveal information not recorded elsewhere for ancestors

St Giles church at Imber

St Giles, Imber

 

Headstones being released this week includes the transcriptions and the images for those at St Giles, Imber on Salisbury Plain, useful for those with ancestors buried there as it is only open a few days a year. St Giles’ Church is in the deserted village of Imber, Wiltshire and was built in the late 13th or early 14th century. The village falls within the British Army’s training grounds on Salisbury Plain and is deserted as a result of the entire civilian population being evicted in 1943 to provide an exercise area for American troops preparing for the invasion of Europe during the Second World War. Once the war came to an end the villagers would have liked to return but were not allowed. The church today is without its pews and its font was moved to Brixton Deverill while the pulpit has been sent to Winterbourne Stoke. St Giles’ seating, bell and two effigies are now housed at Edington Priory. The Church of St Giles is open for visitors and services on specified days of the year when the Ministry of Defence allows access. St Giles is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a Grade I listed building, and is now a redundant church in the care of the Churches Conservation Trust.

 

These fully searchable records released this week are available now to Diamond subscribers of TheGenealogist.

 

Read their article: TheGenealogist adds to its Headstone collection to reveal some fascinating celebrities

 

 

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List of churchyards and burial grounds in this release

Bedfordshire: Lidlington Graveyard, Lidlington; St Andrew, Ampthill; St Lawrence, Wymington Buckinghamshire: St Leonard, Chesham Bois Devon: St Clement, Powderham; All Saints, Kenton Dorset: St Andrew, Fontmell Magna; St Aldhelms, Upton; Church of the Ascension, Woodlands; St Wolfrida, Horton; Sherborne Abbey, Sherborne; St Mary Magdalene, Fifehead Magdalen; St Nicholas, Edmondsham; St Gregory, Marnhull; All Saints, Chalbury; St Laurence, Farnham; St Peter, Pimperne; Holy Trinity, Stourpaine; St Mary, Iwerne Minster; All Saints, Kington Magna Essex: North Road Burial Ground, Westcliff-on-Sea Gloucestershire: St Barnabas, Snowshill; St Peter, Daylesford; Hailes Parish Church, Hailes; St Mary, Driffield; Hampshire: All Saints, Minstead Herefordshire: St Peter and St Paul, Weobley Lincolnshire: St Paul, Morton, Gainsborough London: St Pauls Burial Ground now West Hackney Recreation Ground, Hackney North Yorkshire: St John and All Saints, Easingwold; St John the Evangelist Catholic Church, Easingwold; Christ Church Cemetery, Marton cum Grafton Northamptonshire: St Mary’s Rushden, Rushden; Rushden Cemetery, Rushden; All Saints, Earls Barton; Earls Barton Baptist Church, Earls Barton Oxfordshire: St Mary, Swinbrook Shropshire: St Catherine, Eyton on the Weald Moors; St Cuthbert’s Donington, Albrighton, Wolverhampton; St Bartholomew, Tong Somerset: St John the Baptist, Biddisham; St Nicholas, Brockley; Sawbridgeworth Cemetery, Sawbridgeworth; St Lawrence, Rode; St Lawrence, Cucklington; St Nicholas, Henstridge Suffolk: St Mary, Grundisburgh Wiltshire: St Editha, Baverstock; St Martin, Barford St Martin; St Margaret of Antioch, Corsley; Christ Church, Warminster; Holy Trinity, Bradford on Avon; Baptist Burial Ground, Crockerton; St Leonard, Sutton Veny; St Peter Ad Vincula, Tollard Royal; St Aldhelm, Bishopstrow; Holy Trinity, Dilton Marsh; Christ Church, Bradford on Avon; St Giles, Imber; St John, Warminster; St John the Baptist, Bishopstone Worcestershire: St Eadburgha, Broadway Yorkshire: New Connexion, Shepley, Huddersfield; St Pauls, Shepley, Huddersfield; St Thomas, Thurstonland; St Lucius, Farnley Tyas; Christ Church, New Mill, Holmfirth

 

List of Worcestershire Parishes

Beoley, Birtsmorton, Clent, Cradley Nr Ledbury, Ripple, Severn Stoke, St. Peter The Great, Tenbury Wells, Upper Arley, Upton On Severn, Upton Upon Severn, White Ladies Aston, Whittington, Wolverley, Worcester All Saints, Worcester St Albans, Worcester St Clement, Worcester St Clements, Worcester St Helen, Worcester St John Of Bedwardine, Worcester St Martin, Worcester St Michael, Worcester St Nicholas, Worcester, St Swithun, Worcester St. Helen, Wribbenhall, Wyre Piddle

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Jan 6 19

General Register Office prices rise in February 2019

by Nick Thorne, The Nosey Genealogist

For family history researchers, as in every other field, price rises are inevitable even if unwelcome when on a tight budget. I have always recommended in my course that researchers buy the relevant birth, marriage or death certificate and continue to do so. This is because these copy documents help to make sure that researcher get access to the important information contained on them and to be as sure as we can be that we are adding the correct person into our family tree. Even with the increase in certificate prices that The General Register Office (GRO) has announced, I still stand by that advice.

To be fair, to this government department, this is the first increase in certificate costs since 2010 and so it may be said that it is only to be expected.

 

Copy wedding certificate arrives in post

 

From the 16th February 2019 we now know that the cost of print certificates will increase from £9.25 to £11, and from £23.40 to £35 for the priority service, which provides delivery on the next working day. The same costs will also apply if family history researchers order the certificate from their local register office.

In October 2017 the GRO had introduced a pilot scheme which allowed researchers to order PDF copies of the digitised birth and death records for £6 each. This scheme was a success and after an estimated 79,600 PDF orders rolled in to the GRO in three months, they extended the scheme indefinitely.

The cost of PDF records will also see a rise this February as they now increase to £7 each, with priority deliveries available at £45.

A new charge is also being introduced for researchers who make an application to the GRO for a certificate copy without knowing the index reference. While this has not been charged for to date, there will now be an additional non-refundable fee of £3 in exchange for GRO staff carrying out a search of the index.  Also the GRO will require a fee of £3.50 where they cannot fulfil an order because the staff cannot locate the record with the information provided by the researcher.

Ancestor's wedding certificate

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Dec 23 18

Westminster joins the 1910 Lloyd George Domesday Records with annotated maps online

by Nick Thorne, The Nosey Genealogist

Disclosure: Please note this post contains affiliate links.*

Latest News

TheGenealogist has just released the maps and field books for the Westminster area into its exciting record set, The Lloyd George Domesday Survey. This new release can be used to find where an ancestor lived in 1910 to 1915 in the area around Westminster. This unique combination of maps and residential data held by The National Archives has been digitised by TheGenealogist so that researchers can locate where an ancestor lived. The maps are large scale and exceptionally detailed with hand annotations that, in the majority of cases, allow family historians to find the exact property in the street.

This release of Lloyd George Domesday Survey records covers Westminster and the area shown above

Researchers often have difficulty using modern maps to find where ancestors lived as road names changed over time, the Blitz saw areas bombed to destruction, developers changed sites out of all resemblance from what had stood there before and lanes and roads were extinguished to build housing estates and office blocks. As these records are linked to the maps from the period this means that you have the ability to find the streets as they existed when the survey was carried out and often pinpoint where the old properties had once been.

– Links properties to extremely detailed ordnance survey maps used in 1910

– Shows the original Field book giving a detailed description of the property

– Fully searchable by name, parish and street

 

Complementing the maps on TheGenealogist are the accompanying Field Books that will provide researchers with detailed information relative to the valuation of each property, including the valuation assessment number, map reference, owner, occupier, situation, description and extent.

This mammoth project is ongoing with over 94,500 Field Books, each having hundreds of pages of information on properties to digitise with associated large scale IR121 annotated OS maps.

The release this month covers the civil parishes of Brook, Bryanston Square, Cavendish Square, Church,  Conduit, Curzon, Dorset Square, Dover, Great Marlborough, Grosvenor, Hamilton Terrace, Hamlet of Knightsbridge, Hyde Park, Knightsbridge, Lancaster Gate, Liberty Of The Rolls, Maida Vale, Pall Mall, Petty France, Pimlico North, Pimlico South, Portland Place, Portman Square, Queens Park, Regent 1, Regent 2, St Anne Soho, St Clement Danes, St John Westminster, St Martin in the Fields, St Mary Le Strand, St Paul Covent Garden, Westbourne and Westminster. More areas will be released soon for other London Boroughs and the county of Buckinghamshire.

Find out about these land records at: TheGenealogist.co.uk/1910Survey/

You can read our feature article “Westminster Lloyd George Domesday Survey reveals the American born MP and the Lady with the Lamp

 

 

*Disclosure: Please note this post contains affiliate links. This does not mean that you pay more just that I make a percentage on the sales from my links. The payments help me pay for the cost of running the site. You may like to read this explanation here:

http://paidforadvertising.co.uk

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Dec 16 18

British Merchant Navy – 1915 Crew Lists

by Nick Thorne, The Nosey Genealogist

I came across this while browsing The Brickwall Club‘s Facebook page and I thought it was worthy of sharing with my own blog readers who may be researching their British family tree. The resource is great for any of you out there who had ancestors that served in the British Merchant Navy (MN) in 1915, at the time of the First World War.

The database is provided online for FREE by the National Maritime Museum at their website here: http://1915crewlists.rmg.co.uk

The site explains that this is the first time ever that the Crew Lists of the British Merchant Navy from the year 1915 have been digitised and made available to search for free. It suggests that using their search box you can find relatives and loved ones via their database of over 39,000 crew lists and featuring over 750,000 names.

 

The National Maritime Museum says that as there are no records for individual merchant seafarers from this period, that the records that they are making available are of international significance in highlighting the vital contribution made by the Merchant Navy during the First World War. They go on to state that these records are also of great value to family historians, as one of the few sources of information about seafaring ancestors active in 1915.

 

RMS Lusitania

 

There is a good short description on the website that explains what the Merchant Navy is as well as what crew lists are. So if you have discovered in your family tree a merchant seaman (or woman, as there were some female crew members) then it is worth a look even if you don’t have a mariner from 1915 as an ancestor.

 

The1915 crew list database is online for FREE at the National Maritime Museum’s website here: http://1915crewlists.rmg.co.uk

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Dec 8 18

New record release of Newgate Prison Records reveal thieves and Marie Antoinette’s libeller

by Nick Thorne, The Nosey Genealogist

Disclosure: Please note this post contains affiliate links.*

Latest News

TheGenealogist is adding to its Court and Criminal Records collection with the release of almost 150,000 entries for prisoners locked up in Newgate prison along with any alias they were known by as well as the names of their victims. Sourced from the HO 26 Newgate Prison Registers held by The National Archives, these documents were created over the years 1791 to 1849.

Newgate Gaol, London from TheGenealogist’s Image Archive

The Newgate Prison Registers give family history researchers details of ancestors who were imprisoned in the fearsome building that once stood next to the Old Bailey in the City of London. The records reveal the names of prisoners, offences the prisoner had been convicted for, the date of their trial and where they were tried. The records also give the name of the victims and any alias that the criminals may have used before.

Use the Newgate Prison Registers records to:

  • Find ancestors guilty of crimes ranging from theft, highway robbery, libel and murder
  • Discover the victims of crime
  • Uncover some of the aliases used by criminal ancestors
  • See descriptions of offenders with details of their height, eye colour and complexion
  • Research records covering the period 1791 – 1849

Read the article I put together for them about Marie Antoinette’s libeller locked up in Newgate:

 

*Disclosure: Please note this post contains affiliate links. This does not mean that you pay more just that I make a percentage on the sales from my links. The payments help me pay for the cost of running the site. You may like to read this explanation here:

http://paidforadvertising.co.uk

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Dec 2 18

How do I find my ancestor?

by Nick Thorne, The Nosey Genealogist

Civil Wedding Ceremony

The Signing of the marriage registers with witnesses present. (Not the actual wedding that I went to but an image from Wikipedia!)

 

I was at a civil wedding ceremony this weekend and I couldn’t help but appreciate that before my eyes a record was being created. One that future family historians may seek out to discover more about their ancestor when many years have passed from now.

 

It was afterwards, when sitting down to the meal at the reception that one of the guests asked me what I did. Finding out that I carry out family history research they then told me how they never knew their grandfather – but would now love to discover more about him.

So what was stopping them? They had his name and could work out an approximate date when he would have been born and even knew the area of the UK to look in. It was just that they didn’t know how to go about starting to look, or which documents they could use to carry out the research.

To someone who has been doing research for even a short time it was obvious what to do and where to look. But this encounter brought home to me how we sometimes forget that to many it is a complete mystery!

 

I have put together some Cheet Sheets that are available to download a few pounds or dollars here: Crib Sheets

Hope this helps people in the same situation as my fellow guest at the table this weekend!

 

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Nov 25 18

New release of Parish Records for Warwickshire with images

by Nick Thorne, The Nosey Genealogist

Disclosure: Please note this post contains affiliate links.*

 

 

Latest News

 

 

TheGenealogist has added over 1.5 million individuals to their Warwickshire Parish Record Collection to increase the coverage of this Midland county for researchers wanting to find their ancestors baptisms, marriages and burials.

Kenilworth Parish Church, Warwickshire

Kenilworth Parish Church, Warwickshire

This is the final release of records published in association with Warwickshire County Record Office now totalling nearly 5 million individuals which have the benefit of high quality images to complement the transcripts, making them a valuable resource for those with ancestors from this area.

 

These new fully searchable records can be used to find ancestors from the parishes of: Aston Cantlow, Berkswell, Combrook, Coventry All Saints, Coventry St Peter, Coventry St Thomas, Dunchurch, Exhall, Fillongley, Foleshill St Paul, Grandborough, Hampton in Arden, Harbury, Haseley, Hillmorton, Ilmington, Kenilworth St Nicholas, Kineton, Kingsbury, Lapworth, Leamington Hastings, Leamington Spa St Paul, Lighthorne, Lillington, Long Compton, Long Itchington, Meriden, Middleton, Napton-on-the-Hill, Nether Whitacre, Newbold Pacey, Newbold-on-Avon, Newton Regis, Packwood, Polesworth, Preston-on-Stour, Priors Marston, Quinton, Radford Semele, Radway, Rowington, Rugby St Andrew, Ryton-upon-Dunsmore, Salford Priors, Shustoke, Snitterfield, Southam, Stockingford, Stockton, Stoke, Stoneleigh, Stretton-on-Dunsmore, Stretton-on-Fosse, Studley, Tanworth in Arden, Tredington, Tysoe, Walsgrave-on-Sowe, Warmington, Welford, Wolfhamcote, Wolford, Wolston, Wolvey and Wootton Wawen.

 

These new parish records are available as part of the Diamond Subscription at TheGenealogist.

 

Read TheGenealogist’s article (written by yours truly for them) that finds the baptism of the poet Rupert Brooke and 1887 burial of one Rugby headmaster who turned the school around.

 

*Disclosure: Please note this post contains affiliate links. This does not mean that you pay more just that I make a percentage on the sales from my links. The payments help me pay for the cost of running the site. You may like to read this explanation here:

http://paidforadvertising.co.uk

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Nov 18 18

A New South-West of England Family History Show is coming!

by Nick Thorne, The Nosey Genealogist

News:

With the success of the Discover Your Ancestors Family History Shows’ sell-out London event the organisers have now announced the introduction of a new South-West of England Show to be held in the Exhibition Centre at the University of West of England, Bristol.

Family history show at University of the West of England Exhibition Centre

University of the West of England Exhibition Centre

The organisers have some great offers on these new shows and they now all feature an enhanced format.

  • The Family History Show South-West event will be held on Saturday July 6th 2019
  • With low prices for both exhibitors and attendees, it is a really affordable event for all
  • Featuring fascinating Free Family History Talks
  • A dedicated Ask the Experts section
  • Wide variety of exhibitors from societies and genealogical suppliers

Family history shows expert talks

With expert speakers talking on a wide range of topics to help your research. A final ‘Ask the experts’ Question and Answer session in the lecture theatre will round off the show.

Visitors loved the Family History Show London

Visitors loved the Family History Show, London

 

 

Show Dates:- York 22nd June – South West 6th July – London 24th August

2019 will see the extremely popular Ask the Experts section at all of The Family History Shows events, along with the ever popular lecture theatres with expert genealogical speakers. Free talks will be held throughout the day by DNA experts, Military Historians and other experts at each event.

 

You can see a video of interviews with some of the many happy exhibitors at The Family History Show, London to see how well received these events are. Comments from the stall holders included just how busy they had been throughout the day and what a friendly environment the venue had been. Other exhibitors mentioned what an excellent fair it had been with a good turn out and many interesting stalls that had engaged and impressed those visiting the event.

 

Take a look at the video on their website (or on YouTube) along with another recorded with International Genealogical Blogger, Dick Eastman, who shares his views on the London show: https://thefamilyhistoryshow.com/london/

 

The large crowds of show visitors testified to the public’s willingness to support both the York and the London events. In fact The Family History Show, London doubled its size in 2018 and drew visitors from all over.

To celebrate the announcement of the new South-West show there is a fantastic offer for exhibitors who books tables at both York and London: a Buy one get one Free on tables booked for the South-West event. But hurry this offer will only last till the end of January 2019!

 

Sponsorship packages are also available.

Tickets for The Family History Show South-West are just £5.50 or two for £8 in advance; or £6 on the door, making The Family History Show a very reasonably priced event.

 

The show will be promoted in print, radio and online/social media.

 

Book tickets now to avoid disappointment:

https://thefamilyhistoryshow.com/south-west/tickets/

 

For exhibitors Table Space is good value at only £50 per table – bookable online at: https://thefamilyhistoryshow.com/south-west/booking-form/

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