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Jun 8 18

TheGenealogist adds more records to its new 1921 census substitute

by Nick Thorne, The Nosey Genealogist

Disclosure: Please note this post contains affiliate links.*

 

TheGenealogist logo

 

With the 1921 census still some years away from public release, TheGenealogist has added to its 1921 census substitute. This resource covers a large number of county directories which have been transcribed to produce a searchable resource. This appears under Census Records as the 1921 Census Substitute on TheGenealogist and they encompass a period currently not served by a published census. With this release the total records are boosted to 1.75 million heads of household.

The fully transcribed, searchable records released today will allow researchers to:

  • search on forename, surname and profession
  • search by street, town and county
  • look for a business name
  • discover your ancestors’ addresses
  • find professions listed

These 1921 directories cover Nottingham, Glasgow, Leicestershire & Rutland, Derby, Shropshire, Kent and add to those already released for Aberdeen, Bath, Berkshire, Bradford and Surrounding Districts, Bristol and Suburbs, Brixton and Clapham, Buckinghamshire, Cambridgeshire, Channel Islands, Cheshire, Cumberland, Dorset, Durham, Hessle, Hull, Lincolnshire, London, London County Suburbs, Middlesbrough, Norfolk, Northumberland, Oxfordshire, Somerset, Suffolk, Westmorland, Wiltshire, Worcestershire and Yorkshire. If you have ancestors that you are tracing in the 1920s then this new release from TheGenealogist adds a fantastic name rich resource for you to use.

At a time when we are celebrating the 100 years of women getting the vote we have used this newly released records to find some people with suffragette connections.

See my article here: 1920s Census Substitute Reveals the Suffragists Tea Room

 

 

*Disclosure: Please note this post contains affiliate links. This does not mean that you pay more just that I make a percentage on the sales from my links. The payments help me pay for the cost of running the site. You may like to read this explanation here:

http://paidforadvertising.co.uk/

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Jun 6 18

Who Do You Think You Are? Michelle Keegan’s family tree

by Nick Thorne, The Nosey Genealogist

Michelle Keegan

Our Girl star and Coronation Street actress Michelle Keegan uncovers some exceptional women on her family tree in the episode of Who Do You Think You Are? that is on tonight, Wednesday 6th June 2018 in the U.K.

This Series fifteen of the BBC’s genealogy programme reveals shocking discoveries, laughter and tears along the way. While the rest of the episodes are due to be shown later in the summer, it begins tonight with a stand alone episode to coincide with the BBC’s ‘Hear Her’ series that celebrates the centenary of women obtaining the vote in Britain.

In this programme Michelle Keegan uncovers a special connection to suffragette leader Emmeline Pankhurst when setting out to trace her Mancunian roots. She also follows a branch of her family tree to Gibraltar and back into several generations to the north of Italy.

You can read about the discoveries in this article on TheGenealogist’s website. (Warning: article may contain spoilers.)

Who Do You Think You Are? Michelle Keegan *

 

 

*Disclosure: Please note this post contains an affiliate link. This does not mean that you pay more just that I make a percentage on the sales from my links. The payments help me pay for the cost of running the site. You may like to read this explanation here:

http://paidforadvertising.co.uk/

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Jun 3 18

An Ultimate Beginners Guide to Genealogy

by Nick Thorne, The Nosey Genealogist

Just the other day I was pointed towards a Beginners Guide to Genealogy from the website: HobbyHelp.

This guide is billed as being able to help you get started with your research. It advertises that it will explain:

  • step-by-step how to organize your findings
  • which records to examine first
  • how to conduct oral histories
  • and more.

And it is FREE on the internet: https://hobbyhelp.com/genealogy/?msID=4b848189-8d56-4a9d-8312-658995c6f863

I particularly liked the author Rachel’s 5 steps to getting started as they are sensible and follow what I teach in my own English/Welsh Ancestor course

In her online guide she suggests you:

  1. Get (and stay) organized.
  2. Make a Family Tree.
  3. Consider what you want to know.
  4. Talk with your oldest living family members.
  5. Go to census records.

This is sage advice. Much of the focus of the article is towards American records, but she does also widened her horizon to include some British resources.

I also liked the excellent guidelines for conducting oral interviews with a family members that she goes into.

So if you are one of my blog readers from North America and wondering how to start family history research then this is a good place to begin before you make the leap ‘across the pond’ to trace your English or Welsh ancestors.

Hobby Help’s Genealogy Guide is here.


 

Want to find your elusive English or Welsh ancestor?

I reveal the many resources you should be using when researching your English/Welsh ancestors in my courses and great value Crib-sheets over at Family History Researcher Academy.

 

If you want a quick Cheat Sheet to discover where to look for your elusive ancestors take a look at this.

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May 27 18

TheGenealogist releases Metropolitan Police Habitual Criminal Registers

by Nick Thorne, The Nosey Genealogist

Disclosure: Please note this post contains affiliate links.*

 

TheGenealogist logo

 

TheGenealogist has added to its Criminal Records collections with the release of the Metropolitan Police Criminal Records Office: Habitual Criminals Registers and the Habitual Drunkards Registers.

 

These are high quality transcripts with original colour images of the registers, as well as registers created by the Police to supervise released criminals.

One of the most interesting features of these records are the photographic portraits taken from the Registers of Habitual Drunkards. These feature two photographs – face on and profile – per individual, and some records may also give distinguishing features. The Habitual Drunkards Registers were distributed to licensed premises and the secretaries of clubs to prevent the convicted person from buying alcohol.

  • Entries contain a description of the individual and date of discharge from prison
  • Some records may also give distinguishing features of the individual
  • See face on and profile Photographs of habitual drunks.
  • It may also give the name of the prison, length of sentence and previous convictions.
  • Includes registers created by the Police to supervise released criminals including spies!

 

MEPO 6 records on TheGenealogist

All aspects of society are featured in these records on TheGenealogist.

 

These new records from The National Archive’s MEPO 6 are available as part of the Diamond Subscription at TheGenealogist.

The Criminal Records on TheGenealogist could reveal the darker side of your family tree. Read TheGenealogist’s article on Drunks and Spies in the criminal records

 

 

 

About TheGenealogist

TheGenealogist is an award-winning online family history website, who put a wealth of information at the fingertips of family historians. Their approach is to bring hard to use physical records to life online with easy to use interfaces such as their Tithe and newly released Lloyd George Domesday collections.

TheGenealogist’s innovative SmartSearch technology links records together to help you find your ancestors more easily. TheGenealogist is one of the leading providers of online family history records. Along with the standard Birth, Marriage, Death and Census records, they also have significant collections of Parish and Nonconformist records, PCC Will Records, Irish Records, Military records, Occupations, Newspaper record collections amongst many others.

TheGenealogist uses the latest technology to help you bring your family history to life. Use TheGenealogist to find your ancestors today!

About The National Archives The National Archives is one of the world’s most valuable resources for research and an independent research organisation in its own right. As the official archive and publisher for the UK government, and England and Wales they are the guardians of some of the UK’s most iconic national documents, dating back over 1,000 years. Their role is to collect and secure the future of the government record, both digital and physical, to preserve it for generations to come, and to make it as accessible and available as possible. The National Archives brings together the skills and specialisms needed to conserve some of the oldest historic documents as well as leading digital archive practices to manage and preserve government information past, present and future.

http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/  http://www.legislation.gov.uk/

For the latest stories, follow the Media Team on Twitter @TNAmediaofficer

 

 

*Disclosure: Please note this post contains affiliate links. This does not mean that you pay more just that I make a percentage on the sales from my links. The payments help me pay for the cost of running the site. You may like to read this explanation here:

http://paidforadvertising.co.uk/

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May 21 18

New Website for Forces War Records and a Discount

by Nick Thorne, The Nosey Genealogist

 

Disclosure: Please note this post contains affiliate links.

 

Forces War Records have recently announced the launch of their new look website.

 

Forces War Records new website
Forces War Records – New look site

Here is the press announcement written by them:

 

Forces War Records, the website to visit for anyone researching their family’s military history or searching for ancestors through military data are excited to announce that it’s new and refreshed website is now live.

With a fresh new design and feel, the new look website gives users the opportunity to navigate through Forces War Records extensive database of military records, documents, products and services with ease. Delivering a fully responsive experience, the new website gives users a seamless transition from desktop to mobile browsing and improved searchability. Also, there’s a whole host of smaller but impactful changes, all to make your experience of the Forces War Records site that much better for you.

Visitors are able to explore the new look site by visiting https://www.forces-war-records.co.uk/ Come take a look for yourself.

We hope you like the changes, and if you have any feedback, please let us know via our Customer Services, Facebook or Twitter.

About Forces War Records.

Forces War Records (www.forces-war-records.co.uk) is the website to visit for those researching their family’s military history. Specialising only in military history, the genealogy site contains over 10+ million records of individuals who have served from medieval times – right through to the present day. This fascinating site also has a crack team of professional researchers and military experts on hand to personally uncover extra layers of history about long gone forebears. Its mission is to hold the most in-depth, accurate and helpful military records available.

Initial searches are free, but for a subscription costing, at most, £8.95 a month, users have complete, unrestricted access to Forces War Records’ data. Every time a search is made all files are cross-referenced automatically and every relevant article will appear where a particular ancestor is referenced, maybe even a photo from our historic library archive. Search results can include such information as an individual’s rank, nationality, service number, campaign medals, regiment, battalion, and promotion dates and more. (Please be aware that due to the way we collate and cross-reference our databases, some records will contain more information than that listed)

With the impending World War One Centenary in 2018 marking the 100th anniversary of the end of the First World War, Forces War Records is sure to be the first port of call for many researching the conflict and their family history.

Forces War Records Discount Code

PLEASE USE Promotional code DISCOUNT40 for 40% Discount off membership.

CLICK HERE OR IMAGE BELOW

Forces War Records deal

(off first month only, or 40% off 12 months subscription. Offer Expires: 31/12/2018)

 

 

*Disclosure: Please note this post contains affiliate links. This does not mean that you pay more just that I make a percentage on the sales from my links. The payments help me pay for the cost of running the site. You may like to read this explanation here:

http://paidforadvertising.co.uk/

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May 13 18

Now we know the Celebrities in the next WDYTYA? TV series

by Nick Thorne, The Nosey Genealogist

This week the line up for the next UK series of Who Do You Think You Are was released!

Wall to Wall's Who Do You Think You Are? programmes on the BBC

The Press Release tells us that it includes stars from the world of music, comedy, sport, television and film.

The line up for the 15th series of the BAFTA-award winning genealogy show Who Do You Think You Are? from Wall To Wall (a Warner Bros Television Production UK Ltd company) when it returns to BBC One this summer includes multi-awarding winning actor OLIVIA COLMAN, musician, DJ, fashion designer and British icon BOY GEORGE, Strictly Come Dancing’s Head Judge SHIRLEY BALLAS, comedian and Not Going Out actor LEE MACK, presenter and former JLS member MARVIN HUMES, barrister and television personality ROBERT ‘JUDGE’ RINDER, Our Girl star MICHELLE KEEGAN and gold medal winning Paralympian JONNIE PEACOCK all discover their families’ pasts in this year’s series.

Series fifteen reveals shocking discoveries, laughter and tears along the way, as our eight celebrities travel around the world to unearth the secrets of their ancestors.  Michelle Keegan uncovers some exceptional women on her family tree as she unearths a special connection to suffragette leader Emmeline Pankhurst. Olivia Colman’s journey is one of equal contrasts as she voyages from her family home in Norfolk to India, discovering that her ancestry is more diverse than she had originally thought. While Lee Mack’s investigation brings to light a comedy connection to his great-grandfather who performed on the frontline during WW1. From adultery to asylums, illicit drinking dens to revolutions, our celebrities travel round the world, from Gibraltar to Genoa, India, Jamaica, South Africa and Latvia, as they solve the mysteries in their family trees.

The series will air on BBC One over the summer with Michelle Keegan’s episode launching the series in June as part of the ‘Hear Her’ Season on the BBC which marks the centenary of women getting the vote.

The BBC is set to showcase women’s voices in a dedicated season of content across TV, radio and online to mark 100 years since suffrage and the centenary anniversary of women being able to vote in the UK.

Executive Producer for Wall to Wall, Colette Flight, says: “Britain’s best loved stars are once again delving into their family trees, uncovering hidden secrets and solving mysteries. The stories they unearth are revelatory, often unexpectedly humorous but always affecting.”

BBC Commissioning Editor Fatima Salaria says: “The enduring appeal of Who Do You Think You Are is set to continue as BBC One broadcasts a huge host of names in series 15 including Olivia Colman, Boy George, Marvin Humes and Judge Rinder, which are guaranteed to move and entertain audiences. We’re particularly honoured to launch the series with Michelle Keegan’s episode which uncovers her special connection to Emmeline Pankhurst, as part of the BBC’s ‘Hear Her’ season. This is must see TV at its best.”

Series 15 was commissioned by Charlotte Moore, Director, BBC Content and Tom McDonald, BBC Head of Commissioning, Natural History and Specialist Factual. The Commissioning Editor is Fatima Salaria.

 

 

I know that it is compulsive viewing for many of us, so I am looking forward to the series beginning!

 

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May 5 18

A Warwickshire Marriage Record Key To 18th Century Actress’s Career

by Nick Thorne, The Nosey Genealogist

 

Disclosure: Please note this post contains affiliate links.

 

 

This week I provided TheGenealogist with a new article to go with their release of over a million Warwickshire Parish Records in association with the Warwickshire County Record Offices.

 

See their Press Release here.

 

The article that I penned is a case history using the records on their website and I have to admit I learned quite a bit about the 18th century theatre – and had a laugh at some of the amusing details that I turned up about the subject’s birth place and her father’s profession.

The marriage was central to her career on the stage. Without marrying in Coventry’s Holy Trinity, she would most probably never have become a famous tragedienne! Had she not, then there would be no statue to her in Westminster Abbey, nor one on Paddington Green.

 

 

Read my article that reveals how a Warwickshire marriage was key to the career of an 18th century tragic actress: https://www.thegenealogist.co.uk/featuredarticles/2018/warwickshire-parish-records-reveal-the-marriage-of-an-18th-century-tragedienne-800/

 

 

*Disclosure: Please note this post contains affiliate links. This does not mean that you pay more just that I make a percentage on the sales from my links. The payments help me pay for the cost of running the site. You may like to read this explanation here:

http://paidforadvertising.co.uk/

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Apr 28 18

Newly released: ‘A Concise Briefing’ report for English & Welsh Parish Register research.

by Nick Thorne, The Nosey Genealogist

The Family History Researcher Academy (that is also run be me – Nick Thorne) has just put on sale a brand new Concise Briefing crib-sheet. While the new report is a stand alone product it also compliments the in-depth online English & Welsh family history course that has been available for several years from this website.

 

This Concise Briefing report concentrates on researching in the English and Welsh Parish Registers. It examines the Established Church records, Bishop’s Transcripts and more. Distilled into six pages of great information its aim is to help the researcher understand which resources to use and where to search for your ancestors in these English and Welsh records on and offline.

 

Learn about the County Record Offices and discover the websites that can help you to find your ancestors in Parish Registers – including those that are free-of-charge as well as others that make a commercial charge, or are subscription based.

 

This Concise Briefing also reveals:

  • The background to the English and Welsh Parish Registers.

  • Where to look for the records.

  • Whether you can find registers at the actual church.

  • What Extended registers are.

 

The report is reasonably priced in either US Dollars, Australian Dollars, Canadian Dollars, New Zealand Dollars or British Pounds. Read more at:

https://familyhistoryresearcher.com/fhrmembers/concise-briefing-parish-registers

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Apr 20 18

TheGenealogist adds another 64,920 War Memorial records and 13,487 new Headstone records

by Nick Thorne, The Nosey Genealogist

Disclosure: Please note this post contains affiliate links.*

 

TheGenealogist logo

 

This week TheGenealogist has expanded its growing headstone and war memorial record collections with some interesting new additions to both. The headstone records cover 53 new cemeteries and the various war memorials are from Australia, Britain, Canada and the USA.

The International Headstone collection is an ongoing project where every stone photographed or transcribed earns volunteers credits, which they can spend on subscriptions at TheGenealogist.co.uk or products from GenealogySupplies.com. If you would like to join, you can find out more about the scheme at: https://ukindexer.co.uk/headstone/

The headstone for the Earl of Avon, Anthony Eden, is included in this release. This politician served three periods as British Foreign Secretary and then succeeded Winston Churchill as Prime Minister from 1955 to 1957. He is laid to rest at Alvediston in Wiltshire.

Anthony Eden, Earl of Avon’s grave in Alvediston, Wiltshire on TheGenealogist

Anthony Eden, Earl of Avon’s grave in Alvediston, Wiltshire on TheGenealogist

 

Anthony Eden, Earl of Avon's grave

Anthony Eden, Earl of Avon’s grave in TheGenealogist’s headstone collection

Also published online this week are an additional 64,920 War Memorial records which include a complete roll of honour for both WW1 and WW2 for Shetland, with men’s units and the Shetland village in which they had resided. There are other war memorials in this release that cover the country including the Abercarn Tinplaters Memorial Institute in Wales. There are plaques and monuments in Bedford, Bolton, Lancashire, London, Merseyside, Greater Manchester, Warwickshire and even further afield in Canada, Western Australia and the USA. One of the Canadian memorials is a fascinating, but sadly very worn, WW2 memorial from Calgary in Canada that names 227 aircrew from Australia and New Zealand who died while training in Calgary, revealing just how dangerous WW2 aviation was.

War Memorial at Battery Park, New York, USA, on TheGenealogist

War Memorial at Battery Park, New York, USA, on TheGenealogist

From the USA TheGenealogist has uploaded some WW1 and WW2 war memorials from New York, including a fine one in Battery Park. This is a roll of those men and women who lost their lives in the Atlantic coastal waters in WW2 and had no known grave as a result of U-boat action. The war memorial gives researchers the ranks, units and the US state from which they had come, and the shockingly large number of Americans included is a salutary lesson when in Britain we are often only aware of our own countrymen/women who died at sea from enemy action against the convoys.

 

Lastly there are a number of Boer War memorials – for example the tribute within Blackpool Town Hall that commemorates the 74 Blackpool men who volunteered to join various units for service in South Africa.

 

These new records are all available as part of the Diamond Subscription at TheGenealogist.

 

To find out more about the UKIndexer volunteer project, you can read the following article:

http://www.thegenealogist.co.uk/featuredarticles/2018/family-history-can-be-a-rewarding-hobby-790/

 

 

*Disclosure: Please note this post contains affiliate links. This does not mean that you pay more just that I make a percentage on the sales from my links. The payments help me pay for the cost of running the site. You may like to read this explanation here:

http://paidforadvertising.co.uk/

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Apr 15 18

Finding Women Who Served in WWI and II

by Nick Thorne, The Nosey Genealogist

A WRNS [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

A WWI WRNS [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

On my recent visit to my father I got to talking to him about his mother, my grandmother, and her service in both of the World Wars.

What I gathered from his recollection of her was that in WWII she had been a Leading Petty Officer Wren (WRNS) stationed at Devonport while he was a teen-aged schoolboy. She was living in a flat off the Hoe until the blast from a bomb in one of the raids on Plymouth forced her to find a safer flat on the fringe of Dartmoor. Moving to an ex-nursing home within fifty yards of the Railway station at Bickleigh, with a line into Plymouth, she saw service with the Women’s Royal Naval Service throughout the conflict.

 

It also transpires that in the First World War, as well, she had served in the dockyard before her marriage to my grandfather in 1918. This opened up my mind to the possibility of doing some research into her time in Devenport.

 

With this information about her First World War service I was fascinated to find that The National Archives (TNA) have an on-demand webinar (first put online in 2015) that can help researchers understand what records survive at TNA for women who served in the First World War.

Take a look here:

http://media.nationalarchives.gov.uk/index.php/webinar-women-first-world-war/

While not all the records survive from WWI it is worth a look to see if your ancestor’s records are there.

Second World War records, however, are more difficult as they still remain with the Ministry of Defence. More on this subject in another post.

 

 

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