New Regimental Histories published online

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News:

 

TheGenealogist has just released a set of 50 Regimental Records to join its ever-growing military records collection bringing its total coverage to over 70 different regiments.

Researchers can use the collection to follow an ancestor’s regiment, discovering the battles they took part in and trace their movements. You can also find ancestors who were mentioned in the war movement diaries or listed in the appendices of men and officers of the regiment. 

This release covers records from the 17th century in the earliest incidence, for The Ancient Vellum Book of the Honourable Artillery Company 1611-1682, through to the late 1920s for The King’s Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle, 1927. There are also a large number of Regimental Histories that cover the First World War which can reveal some fascinating details for family historians tracing their ancestors in World War I.

 

Use these records to: 

  • Add colour to a soldier’s story 
  • Read the war movements of his regiment
  • See maps of the regiment’s progress in the theatre of war
  • Discover if a soldier is mentioned in the report of the action
  • Find if an officer or other rank is listed for receiving an Honour or an Award
  • Note the names of those members of the regiment wounded or killed

 

This expands TheGenealogist’s extensive Military records collection.

 

Read their article: Using Regimental Histories to Discover Your Ancestors’ War

 

These records and many more are available to subscribers of TheGenealogist.co.uk

 

 

 

*Disclosure: Please note this post contains affiliate links. This does not mean that you pay more just that I make a percentage on the sales from my links. The payments help me pay for the cost of running the site. You may like to read this explanation here:

http://paidforadvertising.co.uk

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New UK records added to Family Search

 

This weekend I was scanning the FamilySearch blog (https://www.familysearch.org/blog/en/new-records-united-kingdom/) when I noticed this post that is very relevant for English/Welsh family history researchers.

While much is free on the site to view some record images does require you to sign in to Familysearch.org as a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints OR access the site at a family history centre. There is also the alternative of finding the images at Findmypast where fees and other terms may apply.

They write:

 

We are excited to announce that more record collections from the United Kingdom have newly become available and have been added to the FamilySearch library! We hope that these records will help you feel more in touch with a section of history, and we especially hope that they will open doors for you as you continue to research your family roots. Some of these collections include the following:

These record collections cover an interesting and eventful period in British history. As a result, they contain information about some of the United Kingdom’s most prominent men and women, including artists, explorers, politicians, and even royalty! Beyond learning about your own family ties, you can use these records to learn about these individuals and what your ancestors may have experienced during this time of their lives.

For example, you can now view information about Queen Victoria and her family that was recorded in the 1851 census. And you can also find the baptismal record of Charles Dickens in some of the parish records that have now become available. These records collections also include information about figures such as Florence Nightingale, Sir Winston Churchill, and others.

Visit our website  to see even more famous British, some of whom you may be related to! Once you start to build out your family tree on FamilySearch.org, this website can show you connections to ancestors included in these records, as well as 18 famous people who they may have talked about or read about in the newspapers. Once you begin creating a family tree, we can send you hints about matching records to help you discover more ancestors. If you’re a bit of a history buff, these records can be a great place to start perusing information. Or if you were feeling stuck in your United Kingdom family history research, these records might be your chance to push past barriers and discover more about your English heritage.

In any case, we wish you happy hunting!

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New School and University Registers on TheGenealogist

Disclosure: Please note this post contains affiliate links.

 

News:

 

As children go back to school, TheGenealogist has just released a diverse batch of school and university records to join its ever growing education collection.

Cheltenham School
Cheltenham School

Researchers can use this new data to find ancestors who attended or taught at a variety of Educational establishments between the 1830s and 1930s. Also listed are the names of those who held high office in the institutions, such as the patrons, deans, visitors, professors and masters in the case of universities and the principals and governors in the case of schools.

Use these records to add colour to a family story and glean important information from the biographical details to use in further research.

 

The list of records included in this release are:

  • St. Lawrence College Ramsgate Register, 1879 to 1911
  • Upper Canada College Address List 1829-1929
  • The Report Of The President Of Queen’s College Belfast 1896-1897
  • The Glenalmond Register 1847-1929
  • Clifton College Register 1862-1912
  • Edinburgh Institution 1832-1932
  • King Williams College Register 1833-1904
  • The Bradfield College Register 1850-1923
  • The Old Denstonian Chronicle 1915
  • The Old Denstonian Chronicle 1916
  • The Old Denstonian Chronicle 1917
  • The Old Denstonian Chronicle 1918
  • The Old Denstonian Chronicle 1919
  • Isle of Man, King William’s College Register 1833-1927
  • Ireland, The Campbell College Register 1894-1938
  • Eton College, Easter 1862
  • Keble College Register, 1870-1925
  • Rathmines School Roll, 1858-1899
  • Charterhouse Register 1911-1920 Vol. III
  • Cheltenham College Register 1841-1927
  • Alumni Carthusiani, 1614-1872

 

This expands their extensive education records collection.

 

Read my article for them: Find Ancestors in Education Records

 

These records and many more are available to subscribers of TheGenealogist.co.uk

 

 

*Disclosure: Please note this post contains affiliate links. This does not mean that you pay more just that I make a percentage on the sales from my links. The payments help me pay for the cost of running the site. You may like to read this explanation here:

http://paidforadvertising.co.uk

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DNA Painter announced that Trees are now available

 

NEWS:

DNA Painter has announced recently that trees are now available at www.dnapainter.com for all their registered users.

The developer has written that “a tree on DNA Painter is an attractive single-page summary of one person’s direct ancestors that you can search and optionally share:


– Build a simple tree manually or import a GEDCOM file and choose a person from it
– Search by name or location
– Use DNA Filters to visualize the inheritance path for X, Y and mitochondrial DNA
– Tree, fan chart and text views (mobile users will see just tree and text)
– Keep track of your genetic family tree
– Store notes for each ancestor (e.g. possible surnames just beyond your brick walls!)
– Calculate how complete your tree is, and visualize any instances of pedigree collapse
– Keep your tree private, or optionally generate a secret web address as an attractive, user-friendly summary of your direct line to share with DNA matches or family members”

 

Jonathan Perl from DNA Painter has also made available an example of his own tree that you can look at here:
https://dnapainter.com/tree/view/6f627445b38875bb/tree
(no login required)

He says that he hopes you find it useful and that he is looking for feedback.

Integration with chromosome maps are promised later this year.

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