New Lloyd George Domesday Records and Maps released online for Tower Hamlets

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News:

TheGenealogist has just released the Lloyd George Domesday Survey records for Tower Hamlets which cover land owners and occupiers in 1910-1915 with over 91,500 individuals recorded. These now join the previously released data books and their detailed associated maps for other parts of London, bringing the total number to nearly half a million individuals within this record set. 

This new release is the latest phase of TheGenealogist’s extensive ongoing project to digitise over 94,500 Field Books, each having hundreds of pages, and linking them to large scale IR121 annotated OS maps which are now viewable in TheGenealogist’s powerful Map Explorer tool.

The records, which are sourced from The National Archives, were originally compiled by the Valuation Office in a period that stretched from 1910-1915 in response to Lloyd George’s government passing the People’s Budget 1909/1910. 

This new release covers records made of property ownership and occupation in Bethnal Green East, Bethnal Green North, Bethnal Green South, Bethnal Green West, Bow, Bromley, Christchurch, Limehouse, Mile End Centre, Mile End East, Mile End New Town, Mile End North, Mile End South West, Norton Folgate, Old Artillery Ground, Poplar North, Poplar South, Ratcliff, Saint Botolph without Aldgate, Saint George in the East, Shadwell, Wapping and Whitechapel.

 

Coutts Lane identified by TheGenealogist’s map explorer showing the plot on Lloyd George Domesday map

Family historians can use these records to:

  • Find ancestors who owned or occupied property in the Tower Hamlets area of London
  • See the outlines of their houses on large scale maps from the time
  • Fade between historic and modern maps to see how the environment has changed
  • Check details of properties in the neighbourhood by clicking the red pins
  • Locate an address from your research down to a specific house on the map
  • Search by name, parish and street to uncover ancestors’ property in 1910-1915

Complementing the maps on TheGenealogist’s Map Explorer are the accompanying Field Books which provide detailed information relative to the valuation of each property, including the valuation assessment number, map reference, owner, occupier, situation, description and extent.

For family historians looking for ancestors’ homes just before the First World War in the Tower Hamlets area of London this record set is invaluable. 

Read TheGenealogist’s article: Finding Your London Ancestors in the 1910 Land Tax Records

 

 

About TheGenealogist

TheGenealogist is an award-winning online family history website, who put a wealth of information at the fingertips of family historians. Their approach is to bring hard to use physical records to life online with easy to use interfaces such as their Tithe and newly released Lloyd George Domesday collections. 

TheGenealogist’s innovative SmartSearch technology links records together to help you find your ancestors more easily. TheGenealogist is one of the leading providers of online family history records. Along with the standard Birth, Marriage, Death and Census records, they also have significant collections of Parish and Nonconformist records, PCC Will Records, Irish Records, Military records, Occupations, Newspaper record collections amongst many others.

TheGenealogist uses the latest technology to help you bring your family history to life. Use TheGenealogist to find your ancestors today!

 About The National Archives

The National Archives is one of the world’s most valuable resources for research and an independent research organisation in its own right. As the official archive and publisher for the UK government, and England and Wales they are the guardians of some of the UK’s most iconic national documents, dating back over 1,000 years. Their role is to collect and secure the future of the government record, both digital and physical, to preserve it for generations to come, and to make it as accessible and available as possible. The National Archives brings together the skills and specialisms needed to conserve some of the oldest historic documents as well as leading digital archive practices to manage and preserve government information past, present and future.

http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/  http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ 

 

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TheGenealogist’s Map Explorer adds the Charles Booth Poverty Maps of London

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News:

TheGenealogist’s innovative Map Explorer, which allows family history researchers to trace an ancestor’s property and then view the changing environment over time, now boasts another powerful new feature.

While previously researchers were able to view the georeferenced Lloyd George Domesday Survey Data Layer of maps and also see the sites of UK War Memorials, cemeteries and churchyards from across the country, TheGenealogist has now added the fascinating Booth Poverty Maps of London 1898-1899 to this useful resource.

 

  • Use the new Charles Booth Maps to reveal London streets classified by income and class
  • Research neighbourhoods where different classes of people lived close to each other
  • Use the opacity slider to view various modern day maps as a base layer to see the area today

TheGenealogist's Map Explorer displays the streets coloured to show the income and social class of its residents

Map Explorer displays the streets coloured to show the income and social class of its residents

 

 

There were seven classifications detailed on Booth Maps ranging from the lowest to the wealthy. Those streets coloured black were for the ‘Lowest classes. Vicious, semi-criminal’. Next was dark blue for the ‘Very poor, casual. Chronic want’. This was followed by light blue to indicate ‘Poor. 18s to 21s a week for a moderate family’. Streets in purple indicated ‘Mixed. Some comfortable others poor’. Those roads in pink were ‘Fairly comfortable. Good ordinary earnings’. Red designated a street inhabited by the ‘Middle class. Well to do’, while yellow the ‘Upper-middle and upper classes. Wealthy.’

 

Diamond subscribers to TheGenealogist are able to use the interface by clicking on the large map of England, Scotland and Wales on the main search page.

 

The next screen allows the researcher to enter major street names or an area so that you can browse the locality.

 

In the recent BBC 1 Who Do You Think You Are? episode, Oscar winning actress Kate Winslet was researching her 2x great-grandfather, a Swedish born tailor, who lived in Great Pulteney Street, Westminster. Using this example we start typing Great Pulteney into the search box. We are presented with a choice of two from which we select the one that is in the City of Westminster, Greater London. Under Map Layers we chose the ‘Historic – Middle Layer’ and here select the ‘1898-1899 Charles Booth’s London’ from the dropdown menu. This will now highlight the street on the map.

 

TheGenealogist’s powerful Map Explorer has been developed to view these georeferenced historic maps overlaid on top of modern background maps including those from Ordnance Survey and Bing Street maps, as well as a satellite view. With the Map Explorer you can search for an ancestor’s property, discovering its site, even if the road has changed or is no longer there.

 

See the featured article on Kate Winslet’s episode of Who Do You Think You Are? where she makes use of the Booth Maps in her research.

 

Find out more at TheGenealogist.co.uk/maps/

 

 

Previous Map Explorer releases added

  • Lloyd George property maps linked to their data books
  • Cemeteries viewable on the maps – enabling researchers to locate burial grounds and view Headstone images, transcripts and cemetery views.
  • War Memorial site locations with links to see photographs, transcripts and setting.

 

About TheGenealogist

 

TheGenealogist is an award-winning online family history website, who put a wealth of information at the fingertips of family historians. Their approach is to bring hard to use physical records to life online with easy to use interfaces such as their Tithe and newly released Lloyd George Domesday collections.

 

TheGenealogist’s innovative SmartSearch technology links records together to help you find your ancestors more easily. TheGenealogist is one of the leading providers of online family history records. Along with the standard Birth, Marriage, Death and Census records, they also have significant collections of Parish and Nonconformist records, PCC Will Records, Irish Records, Military records, Occupations, Newspaper record collections amongst many others.

 

TheGenealogist uses the latest technology to help you bring your family history to life. Use TheGenealogist to find your ancestors today!

 

 

*Disclosure: Please note this post contains affiliate links. This does not mean that you pay more just that I make a percentage on the sales from my links. The payments help me pay for the cost of running the site. You may like to read this explanation here:

http://paidforadvertising.co.uk

Send to Kindle

Clearing up questions about DNA for Ancestor research

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New Book:

 

I was sent a review copy of Pen & Sword’s book Tracing Your Ancestors Using DNA,* a Guide for Family Historians and it really is clearing up some of the questions that I had about DNA tests for discovering my ancestors.

Like many, I have done a DNA test or two and then I look at the results and while I can see some “cousins” that I have no idea how we are related, I still wonder what else I can do with my results having taken the test.

There is always the worry that I may have chosen the wrong test to do, and can someone explain what the principles and the purpose of DNA testing is?

Tracing Your Ancestors Usng DNA

https://www.pen-and-sword.co.uk/Tracing-Your-Ancestors-Using-DNA/p/16347/?aid=1101  *

 

It is therefore great to have got my hands on a book that aims to make it clear what is the science behind DNA and how it can be of use to those of us who want to use it for furthering our family tree research. It is welcome that the book states that we need to use DNA results in collaboration with traditional record research and so it is important that we continue to look for ancestors in the records as before.  This book covers the subject of DNA in a way that genealogists will find useful and sympathetic to what we are trying to achieve in our research.

Tracing Your Ancestors Using DNA is edited by Graham S Holton with contributions from John Cleary, Michelle Leonard, Iain McDonald and Alisdair F. Macdonald and they compare various DNA tests, explain the principles and purposes of doing a test, cover the ethical and legal issues raised and describe what can be learnt from the DNA of our distant ancestors.

I was impressed by how I came away having learnt a lot, even though it is a quite complex subject to tackle. I will admit, however, that it did need some careful reading in some cases before I experienced a number of those “light-bulb” moments when I realised that I now understood more about Y-DNA,  mtDNA, and atDNA.

Recommended for anyone thinking of doing a test – this is an informative volume that most will find interesting to read.

 

Priced £14.99 but discounted to £11.99 at time of writing.

Read more at Pen & Sword’s website here: Tracing Your Ancestors Using DNA *

 

 

 

*Disclosure: Please note this post contains affiliate links. This does not mean that you pay more just that I make a percentage on the sales from my links. The payments help me pay for the cost of running the site. You may like to read this explanation here:

http://paidforadvertising.co.uk

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New Searchable Headstones online

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News:

 

TheGenealogist has just released nearly 60,000 new individuals on Headstones from another 61 churchyards and cemeteries. This means that there are now a total of over 174,500 individuals that are fully searchable in TheGenealogist’s Headstone collection which has examples from across England, Scotland and Wales as well as Jersey in the Channel Islands, Cyprus and India.

Search for headstones of ancestors

The new data will allow the family history researcher to discover:

  • 60,000 individuals recorded on Headstones
  • churchyards and cemeteries from various parts of England and Wales
  • use the Map Explorer to see the location of cemeteries in and around an ancestor’s town

 

TheGenealogist has imaes and transcripts of ancestors headstones

The headstone of Herbert, Ist Baron Austin (Founder of Austin Motor Company) in Lickey Churchyard

 

This release covers the burial grounds at the following:

Anglesey, St Tysilio; Atcham, St Eata; Badger, St Giles; Belbroughton, Holy Trinity; Betws-y-Coed; Bishops Wood, St John; Blymhill, St Mary; Boningale, St Chad; Bristol, St Paul; Buckhorn Weston, St John; Bylchau, St Thomas; Capel Garmon; Cofton Hackett, St Michael & All Angels; Dolwyddelan, St Gwyddelan; East Orchard, St Thomas; East Stour, Christ Church; Edgerton Cemetery; Frankley, St Leonard; Gwytherin, St Winefride; Harlow, St Mary Little Parndon; Harlow, St Mary Magdalene; Heanton Punchardon, St Augs; Henllan, St Sadwrn; Ince, St James; Iwerne Courtney; Lickey Parish Church; Lickey Rose Hill; Llanedwen; Llanfair Talhaiarn; LLangernyw Capel Garnedd; Llangernyw, St Digain; Llanrwst Seion Methodist Chapel; Llanrwst, St Mary; Llansannan Capel Coffa; Llansannan, St Sannan; Llanwrst, St Grwst; Long Crichel, St Mary; Marnhull Cemetery; Marnhull, Our Lady; Meltham, St James; Newborough, St Peter; Penistone, St John; Penmachno Capel; Penmachno, St Tudclud; Pensford, St Thomas a Becket; Pentrefoelas Church; Publow All Saints; Purse Caundle, St Peter; Rhydymwyn, St John; Santon Downham, St Mary; Shillingstone, Holy Rood; Tal-y-Bont Capel; Tisbury Cemetery; Todber, St Andrew; Trefnant Holy Trinity; Trefriw, St Mary; Tyn-y-Groes; West Orchard, St Luke; Wilton, St Mary & St Nicholas; Wroxeter, St Andrew; Ysbyty Ifan, St John

 

These fully searchable records are transcribed from images of the headstone memorials. This latest release from TheGenealogist covers many parts of the UK, the images and the transcriptions being provided by volunteers working for the UKIndexer projects which rewards those who wish to photograph, transcribe or do both with credits to pay for genealogy books, software, online subscriptions and more.

 

Read my article on the UKIndexer Volunteers find Family History:

 

These records released today are available to Diamond subscribers of TheGenealogist as part of the Deaths and Burials Records collection.

 

 

*Disclosure: Please note this post contains affiliate links. This does not mean that you pay more just that I make a percentage on the sales from my links. The payments help me pay for the cost of running the site. You may like to read this explanation here:

http://paidforadvertising.co.uk

Send to Kindle