Announcing Map Explorer a powerful new map tool to trace ancestors’ properties

TheGenealogist announces its Map Explorer a powerful new map tool designed to help trace ancestors’ properties through time.

(Disclosure: Please note this blog post contains affiliate links that help me pay for this website.*)

 

TheGenealogist’s latest innovation helps you find an ancestor’s property and watch the landscape change over time. The team have georeferenced their Lloyd George Maps for Greater London which are available at launch, with further exciting developments planned for the coming months.

 

  • TheGenealogist’s Map Explorer displays maps for different historical periods up to the modern day
  • Maps are fully searchable by county, parish, street and even postcode
  • Zoom down to show the individual properties as they were at the time
  • Use the transparency slider to reveal a modern street map underneath
  • Change the modern base map displayed to more clearly understand what the area looks like today
  • Georeferenced pins link to the records for each property
  • Display county or parish boundaries
  • Find out more and watch the video at TheGenealogist.co.uk/maps/

 

The powerful Map Explorer has been developed to view these georeferenced historic maps overlaid on top of modern background maps including those from Ordnance Survey and Bing Street maps, as well as a satellite view, letting you see where your ancestor’s house is today.

 

To complement the launch of the new Map Explorer, TheGenealogist has also released historic Ordnance Survey maps covering England, Scotland and Wales between the 1890’s and 1960’s. These have also been georeferenced, allowing you to see how the landscape changed over time.

 

These maps have been divided up into 3 types of layer that can be viewed on top of each other like sheets of paper –  you can then change the transparency of a layer to view the layers below.

 

The Base Layer

This is the modern layer, which can be used to select a modern OS Map, Open Street Map or a Bing Satellite Image.

 

The Historic Layer

The historic layer can be used to select a range of OS maps from the 1890’s to the 1960’s

 

Record Set Layer

This layer provides access to map record sets such as the Lloyd George Domesday, or the soon to be launched Georeferenced Tithe Maps. Keep an eye out as further record sets are added to this layer in the future. This layer also has the ability to show “Pins”, these are map markers that link directly to the records so you can see who was living in a particular property.

[The new Map Explorer from TheGenealogist, going from a historic map to satellite view]

 

 

The new Map Explorer has several tools to aid researchers, such as the “Place Search”.  This allows you to enter a postcode or address (either Modern or Historic) and jump to that location on the maps.

 

Further tools let you see county and parish boundaries and even historic “Wards”, which were the areas that the Lloyd George Domesday Survey were divided into.

[Map showing coverage now available for Lloyd George Domesday Maps]

 

Researchers are now able to view Lloyd George Domesday Maps for the Greater London Area (Survey books for this area are being released ward by ward over the coming months).

 

Now you can pinpoint properties old and new with TheGenealogist’s Map Explorer.

 

Find out more and watch the video at TheGenealogist.co.uk/maps/

 

About TheGenealogist

 

TheGenealogist is an award-winning online family history website, who put a wealth of information at the fingertips of family historians. Their approach is to bring hard to use physical records to life online with easy to use interfaces such as their Tithe and newly released Lloyd George Domesday collections.

 

TheGenealogist’s innovative SmartSearch technology links records together to help you find your ancestors more easily. TheGenealogist is one of the leading providers of online family history records. Along with the standard Birth, Marriage, Death and Census records, they also have significant collections of Parish and Nonconformist records, PCC Will Records, Irish Records, Military records, Occupations, Newspaper record collections amongst many others.

 

TheGenealogist uses the latest technology to help you bring your family history to life. Use TheGenealogist to find your ancestors today!

 

 

 

*Disclosure: Please note this post contains affiliate links. This does not mean that you pay more just that I make a percentage on the sales from my links. The payments help me pay for the cost of running the site. You may like to read this explanation here:

http://paidforadvertising.co.uk/

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How did our ancestors cope when they were apart in a family crisis?

I’ve just been out of circulation for a couple of weeks. An elderly parent of mine has been very sick with a diagnosis that holds out little hope and so I did what any concerned son would do, I packed a bag and travelled home to be with them.

These days we have the luxury of fast travel – in my case it was a 50 minute flight from Jersey in the Channel Islands to East Midlands Airport, close to my parent’s place in North West Leicestershire.

But this got me thinking about how my ancestors would have coped in the circumstances. Some of them lived in Britain while their offspring had fled the coup to try their hand “Out East”, in Singapore, Ceylon (Sri Lanka) and India.

It would have been a mammoth journey to get back to England by ship from these parts before air-travel had made it less time consuming. Even in the 1950s, when I am told my Dad flew back to Europe from Singapore, it was a long drawn out affair with several hotel stops on the way.

But what would the Victorians and Georgians have done? Well there was little alternative to booking a passage on a ship – and then it could be months to return to “Blighty”.  This doesn’t even take into account the length of time for the sick message to have got out to them in the first place. In our modern world of communication and travel we just don’t realise how cut off some of our ancestors must have felt when their grownup children were off in another part of the world.

 

I’ve been looking at the passenger lists online this week and wondering what the stories were behind some of the reasons to travel that these folk had. There are several decades of outgoing passenger lists to be found on several websites including that of TheGenealogist, whom I write articles for on a paid for basis and so that is why I include a link to them. You may, of course, search other sources to find your forebears in the Board of Trade Passenger Lists and marvel at just how long it took the past generations to travel anywhere!

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Speakers Announced For 2019 Family History Shows

The Family History Shows 2019

York 22nd June  –  South West 6th July  –  London 24th August

NEWS:

Expert Speakers Announced! The Family History Shows have released the details of the experts giving talks at the upcoming events. In this post we take a look at some of the speakers who will be offering free talks throughout the day at selected shows.

Don’t forget to book your tickets to The Family History Show and you can save on entry price. These events are on track to be a fantastic day out for family historians this summer. Book now before the offer ends!


South West

Tickets on the day are £6
Early Bird: Two for £8!

Buy Bristol Tickets

York

Tickets on the day are £6
Early Bird: Two for £8!

Buy York Tickets

London

Tickets on the day are £8
Early Bird: Two for £10!

Buy London Tickets

Gill Blanchard

Professional genealogist, house historian, tutor and author

Gill Blanchard has an academic background in history, sociology and politics to post-graduate level. She has been a full time researcher since 1992, including six years at Norfolk Record Office. She set up her own historical research business called Past Search in 1997, qualified as an adult education tutor the following year, and is a full member of AGRA. Gill has conducted much background research for authors, journalists and academic researchers, including the BBC Who Do You Think You Are? television series.

Gill will be speaking at the York, South West and London shows.

Debbie Kennett

DNA Expert & Author

“I am a surname researcher and genetic genealogist. I am an Honorary Research Associate in the Department of Genetics, Evolution and Environment at UCL. I am the author of two books published by the History Press: ‘The Surnames Handbook’ (2012) and ‘DNA and Social Networking’ (2011).”

Debbie will be speaking at the York and South West shows.

Jayne Shrimpton

Fashion historian and photo dating expert

Jayne Shrimpton MA, a trained, professional dress historian and photographs/artworks specialist has dated and interpreted numerous family pictures over a career spanning 30 years. She writes regular articles for Discover Your Ancestors and other genealogy magazines, is the author of seven books, and is a picture consultant on the TV series Who Do You Think You Are?

Jayne will be speaking at the York and London shows.

Chris Baker

Military Historian & Author

“Over the years many people have asked me for help in researching a soldier. I initially did this as a hobby, but with so many people asking and me being busy at work, something had to give. I decided to make a living out of my passion and left my old career behind on 25 April 2008. I now work full time on writing, researching and touring. My business FourteenEighteen | Research is always bursting at the seams; in all, I have completed research of well over 8000 soldiers.”

Chris will be speaking at the London and South West shows.

Keith Gregson

Sport and Social Historian & Author

Keith Gregson has been writing for over 40 years, including many family history books and contributions to popular magazines including Discover Your Ancestors. In his talk at The Family History Show, Keith shares his top tips & techniques for finding elusive ancestors, illustrated by some fascinating case studies.

Keith will be speaking at the York show.

 

This is what the organisers say:

What will be available?

Each show will have two lecture areas with Free Talks given by various expert independent speakers including Photo Dating Expert and Fashion Historian Jayne Shrimpton, DNA Expert Debbie Kennett and others we have lined up and will announce in later emails and on our Facebook page.

The extremely popular face to face Free ‘Ask the Experts’ section will be run at all of the Discover Your Ancestors Family History Shows this year. We’re also expanding this area to cover your questions on DNA, Dating Photographs, Medals, Military Service and Research Problems. So don’t forget to bring your ancestors’ medals, records and photos along!

New for the 2019 shows we are also introducing Q&A panel sessions, where you can get your family history queries answered by a group of experts. So make sure you have time to ask those family history questions when planning your day.

With over 100 tables already booked, space is filling up fast! If you or anyone you know may be interested in exhibiting you can find out more on our bookings page.

We are making The Family History Shows affordable events to attend with low-cost entry, Free Talks and Free Parking. Book your tickets now to avoid disappointment.

Keep up with our latest announcements for all our shows on Twitter and Facebook.

 

I hope to be at all three shows this year. Putting the dates in the diary now!

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My Top Family History Map resources

I’ve been looking for where some ancestors lived this week and it was to historic maps of all sorts that I have turned in my quest to understand a bit more about the area that they lived and worked within during the period that they were alive.

Some of the areas in the towns have been “extensively remodelled” by a combination of Blitz bombing and modern town planners and so the roads have disappeared.

Here is a video that I put together a couple of years ago but it is still relevant today!

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