Finding my ancestor in the newly released Change of Name Database

Disclosure: Please note this post contains affiliate links.*

 

TheGenealogist logo

 

This week I was taking a look around the newly released Change of Name Database on TheGenealogist so that I could put together an article for their website when I came across one of my own collateral ancestors in the database. My maternal line includes a number of fascinating Scots that would seem to have had a bit of money and land. This is stark contrast to others in my tree that had very little in the way of property.

I was thrilled, when using this new resource, to discover the official change of name where my 3x great grandmother’s elder brother was being made a baronet and officially registering a change of name from having a double-barrelled surname to a triple-barrelled one of 26 characters long!

You can read the article on Change of Names here.

 

The reason for my article was to compliment TheGenealogist releasing the new resource for family historians wanting to find ancestors who had officially changed their forename or surname in Britain. Their Change of Name Database covers information gathered from a number of sources including Private Acts of Parliament; Royal Licences published in the London and Dublin Gazettes; notices of changes of name published in The Times after 1861 with a few notices from other newspapers; registers of the Lord Lyon [King of Arms] where Scottish changes of name were commonly recorded; records in the office of the Ulster King at Arms and also some private information.

 

You can use this database to:

  • Discover ancestors that recorded a change of name
  • Find what name had been adopted and the name discarded

 

Their second release this month is to coincide with the return of The Family History Show, York to the racecourse on Saturday 23rd June, which I am attending.

TheGenealogist has now added the Colour Tithe Maps for the North Riding and the East Riding of Yorkshire. Complimenting the already released schedule books and greyscale maps, these colour maps add an attractive visual aid to find where your ancestor lived in the mid 1800s.

 

The fully searchable tithe records released online allow researchers to:

  • Find plots of land owned or occupied by ancestors in early Victorian North Riding and East Riding of Yorkshire on colour maps
  • See where your forebears lived, farmed or perhaps occupied a small cottage or a massive estate.

 

 

*Disclosure: Please note this post contains affiliate links. This does not mean that you pay more just that I make a percentage on the sales from my links. The payments help me pay for the cost of running the site. You may like to read this explanation here:

http://paidforadvertising.co.uk/

Send to Kindle

Take a trip to a Family History Show such as the one at York

Queue at York Family History Fair

Next weekend on Saturday 23rd of June 2018 there is one of the largest gathering of family historians in England taking place at The Knavesmire Exhibition Centre, The Racecourse, York, YO23 1RX.

If you are in the area then I urge you to pop along between 10am and 4.30pm and see what you may learn. I’ve been a couple of times now and found that its not just aimed at people with Yorkshire ancestors – so it is worth a visit where ever your ancestors came from.

I am already checking my tickets and planning my trip as I love attending these events for all the useful information that you can pick up from the likes of the family history society stands, genealogical suppliers and from the talks in the lecture area.

 

Click here to pre-book your tickets for The Family History Show, York and buy one get one half price!  But do hurry, as pre-booking closes at the end of Wednesday 20th June!

With even more exhibitors attending this year, the York Family History Fair is probably the largest event of its kind in England with many family history societies and companies attending each year. There is also lots of local history from the York area too.

 

Facilities include:

  • Free Talks from Expert Speakers
  • Exhibitors from all over the UK
  • Free Parking
  • Cafe with refreshments available all day
  • Fully accessible with lifts and ramps throughout

The show is organised by Discover Your Ancestors Magazine and is sponsored by TheGenealogist and S&N Genealogy Supplies.

 

Saturday 23rd June 2018 – 10am to 4.30pm

The Knavesmire Exhibition Centre, The Racecourse, York, YO23 1EX

Admission: Adults £5.00, Children under 14 FREE

https://thefamilyhistoryshow.com/york/tickets/

Send to Kindle

TheGenealogist adds more records to its new 1921 census substitute

Disclosure: Please note this post contains affiliate links.*

 

TheGenealogist logo

 

With the 1921 census still some years away from public release, TheGenealogist has added to its 1921 census substitute. This resource covers a large number of county directories which have been transcribed to produce a searchable resource. This appears under Census Records as the 1921 Census Substitute on TheGenealogist and they encompass a period currently not served by a published census. With this release the total records are boosted to 1.75 million heads of household.

The fully transcribed, searchable records released today will allow researchers to:

  • search on forename, surname and profession
  • search by street, town and county
  • look for a business name
  • discover your ancestors’ addresses
  • find professions listed

These 1921 directories cover Nottingham, Glasgow, Leicestershire & Rutland, Derby, Shropshire, Kent and add to those already released for Aberdeen, Bath, Berkshire, Bradford and Surrounding Districts, Bristol and Suburbs, Brixton and Clapham, Buckinghamshire, Cambridgeshire, Channel Islands, Cheshire, Cumberland, Dorset, Durham, Hessle, Hull, Lincolnshire, London, London County Suburbs, Middlesbrough, Norfolk, Northumberland, Oxfordshire, Somerset, Suffolk, Westmorland, Wiltshire, Worcestershire and Yorkshire. If you have ancestors that you are tracing in the 1920s then this new release from TheGenealogist adds a fantastic name rich resource for you to use.

At a time when we are celebrating the 100 years of women getting the vote we have used this newly released records to find some people with suffragette connections.

See my article here: 1920s Census Substitute Reveals the Suffragists Tea Room

 

 

*Disclosure: Please note this post contains affiliate links. This does not mean that you pay more just that I make a percentage on the sales from my links. The payments help me pay for the cost of running the site. You may like to read this explanation here:

http://paidforadvertising.co.uk/

Send to Kindle

Who Do You Think You Are? Michelle Keegan’s family tree

Michelle Keegan

Our Girl star and Coronation Street actress Michelle Keegan uncovers some exceptional women on her family tree in the episode of Who Do You Think You Are? that is on tonight, Wednesday 6th June 2018 in the U.K.

This Series fifteen of the BBC’s genealogy programme reveals shocking discoveries, laughter and tears along the way. While the rest of the episodes are due to be shown later in the summer, it begins tonight with a stand alone episode to coincide with the BBC’s ‘Hear Her’ series that celebrates the centenary of women obtaining the vote in Britain.

In this programme Michelle Keegan uncovers a special connection to suffragette leader Emmeline Pankhurst when setting out to trace her Mancunian roots. She also follows a branch of her family tree to Gibraltar and back into several generations to the north of Italy.

You can read about the discoveries in this article on TheGenealogist’s website. (Warning: article may contain spoilers.)

Who Do You Think You Are? Michelle Keegan *

 

 

*Disclosure: Please note this post contains an affiliate link. This does not mean that you pay more just that I make a percentage on the sales from my links. The payments help me pay for the cost of running the site. You may like to read this explanation here:

http://paidforadvertising.co.uk/

Send to Kindle

An Ultimate Beginners Guide to Genealogy

Just the other day I was pointed towards a Beginners Guide to Genealogy from the website: HobbyHelp.

This guide is billed as being able to help you get started with your research. It advertises that it will explain:

  • step-by-step how to organize your findings
  • which records to examine first
  • how to conduct oral histories
  • and more.

And it is FREE on the internet: https://hobbyhelp.com/genealogy/?msID=4b848189-8d56-4a9d-8312-658995c6f863

I particularly liked the author Rachel’s 5 steps to getting started as they are sensible and follow what I teach in my own English/Welsh Ancestor course

In her online guide she suggests you:

  1. Get (and stay) organized.
  2. Make a Family Tree.
  3. Consider what you want to know.
  4. Talk with your oldest living family members.
  5. Go to census records.

This is sage advice. Much of the focus of the article is towards American records, but she does also widened her horizon to include some British resources.

I also liked the excellent guidelines for conducting oral interviews with a family members that she goes into.

So if you are one of my blog readers from North America and wondering how to start family history research then this is a good place to begin before you make the leap ‘across the pond’ to trace your English or Welsh ancestors.

Hobby Help’s Genealogy Guide is here.


 

Want to find your elusive English or Welsh ancestor?

I reveal the many resources you should be using when researching your English/Welsh ancestors in my courses and great value Crib-sheets over at Family History Researcher Academy.

 

If you want a quick Cheat Sheet to discover where to look for your elusive ancestors take a look at this.

Send to Kindle