A new census substitute for the year 1921 released by TheGenealogist

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Leading on from my post last week about ancestors that changed their address, this is exciting news from TheGenealogist…

TheGenealogist has sent out a press release that announces that they have released a brand new circa 1921 resource. This is brilliant news for those tracing their British ancestry as it is for a period that is not presently served by a census because of the 100 year rule for census releases.

The new record set covers 23 counties, and is made up of over one million records. They form part of TheGenealogist’s Trade, Residential & Telephone collection.  

The records are fully transcribed, searchable and enable researchers to:

  • search on forename, surname and profession
  • search by street, town and county
  • look for a business name
  • discover your ancestors’ addresses
  • find professions listed

 

TheGenealogist says that their 1921 directories cover the North, South, East and the West of England, the Channel Islands and reach up the country right up to Aberdeen. If you are researching your ancestors in the years around 1921, then this new release will offer a fantastic name rich resource to use.

Searching for householders within these 23 newly released county directories returns a huge number of names from that time and include a great many that are still famous today.

A number of examples that these new records allow us to discover include Harry Gordon Selfridge, founder of Selfridge’s department store; Jesse Boot, who set up the chemist chain that still carries his name; Winnie-the-Pooh’s author A. A. Milne; J.M. Barrie, who created the characters of Peter Pan and Wendy; plus the celebrated economist, John Maynard Keynes. I wrote a feature article for TheGenealogist to highlight how I found these examples and it can be found on their website at: Addressing Where They Were in 1921

The areas that have been covered in this release include:

  • Aberdeen
  • Bath
  • Berkshire
  • Bradford and Surrounding Districts
  • Bristol and Suburberbs
  • Brixton and Clapham
  • Buckinghamshire
  • Cambridgeshire
  • Channel Islands
  • Cheshire
  • Cumberland
  • Dorset
  • Durham
  • Hessle
  • Hull
  • Lincolnshire
  • London
  • London County Suburbs
  • Middlesbrough
  • Norfolk
  • Northumberland
  • Oxfordshire
  • Somerset
  • Suffolk
  • Westmorland
  • Wiltshire
  • Worcestershire
  • Yorkshire

TheGenealogist says that they will be adding further counties in the coming months.

 

To read my article for FREE head over to: http://www.thegenealogist.co.uk/featuredarticles/2017/addressing-where-they-were-in-1921-571/

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Tracing ancestors as they changed address

 

Find your ancestors in Trades DirectoriesWe all know that we can find our ancestors’ address in the census taken between 1841 and 1911 in the U.K.

But we should remember that, just as we may have moved several times in between the last time that we were enumerated, so did our ancestors.

I was researching a particular forebear of mine and had got hold of his army service records. I was drawn to his address at the time of his attestation and then at the end of the war. The address had changed as a result of he and his wife going through a divorce.

I was recently in The National Archives in Kew and just adjacent to the area where The London Family History Centre has its area, located in the Reading Room of TNA, was a shelf of Trades, Residential and Court directories. While I had some time to wait for some research documents to be delivered, I began browsing these books. What I noticed was that if I looked through the different years, for my ancestor’s county, I could see that my subject moved around his home town a bit more frequently than I had previously supposed.

You don’t need to go to and archive, library or record office to find your ancestors in these directories as they can be easily accessed on many of the data websites as well.

Other records that can be used to map out the movements of an ancestor include the addresses given on civil registration certificates of birth, marriage and death and all sorts of other records that were created when our forebears came up against authority in its many guises.

The National Archives

My visit to The National Archives was to take a look at a court document that referred to my ancestor and there again it revealed yet another address for him.

It was at this stage that I realised that it would be a good idea if I started some notes on my mobile family member and so I began recording the dates and his various abodes in a list.

 

There are modules in my online course that look at the many different records that we are lucky in this country to get access to in more depth. If you are researching your ancestors from England and Wales and have hit a brick wall then my online Family History Researcher Academy course is available here:

www.familyhistoryresearcher.com/course

The course can be started and completed in your own time with 52 weekly tutorials being made available to you over a one year period. Currently I have some tempting offers so take a look before the price increases!

FamilyHistoryResearcher.com

 

 

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TheGenealogist has launched over 1.3 million Parish Records for Northumberland

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TheGenealogist has expanded its UK Parish Records collection with the release of over 1,363,000 new records for Northumberland.  These records make it easier to find your ancestors’ baptisms, marriages and burials in these fully searchable records that cover the ancient parishes of the northernmost county of England. Some of the records can take you as far back as 1560.

In this release you can find the records of:

903,314 individuals in Baptisms, 157,329 individuals in Marriages and 302,378 individuals in Burials

 

Use these records to find the names of ancestors, parents’ forenames (in the case of baptisms), father’s occupation (where given), abode or parish, parish that the event took place in, the date of the event, in the case of marriage records, the bride’s maiden name and the witnesses’ names.

In these records you can find Grace Horsley Darling, the famous lighthouse keeper’s daughter who saved the crew from a shipwrecked paddle steamer. She was born on 24th November 1815, at her grandfather’s cottage in Bamburgh in Northumberland and was baptised the following month.

Grace was the daughter of William and Thomasine Darling who, when only a few weeks old, was taken to live in a small cottage attached to the lighthouse on Brownsman Island, one of the Farne Islands off the coast of Northumberland.

Her father ran the lighthouse there and she is famed for participating in the rescue of survivors from the shipwrecked paddle steamer Forfarshire in 1838.

It was carrying sixty two people when it foundered on the rocks, split in two, the survivors managed to clamber onto Big Harcar a rocky island and were spotted by Grace looking from an upstairs window. She and her father rowed out in a four man boat for a distance of about a mile and between them rescued the nine survivors.

 

Search these and millions of other records on https://www.thegenealogist.co.uk

 

 

Compensation disclosure: Affiliate links are used in the above post.

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Living DNA users can now explore their family ancestry (Autosomal DNA) in three different ways

Disclosure: Please note this post contains affiliate links.

 

 

I logged into my account with LivingDNA this week and thought:

“Hang on a minute, something has changed here. I’ve got a more comprehensive way of looking at my results!”

I clicked through to see the news on their website and found out that I was right in thinking this.

The update had happened while I was busy preparing for my trip away and was posted to their own blog on the 18th June 2017 and that is why I missed it. For all those readers who may have missed it themselves I read that Living DNA users are now able to start to explore their family ancestry (Autosomal DNA) in three different ways. Their blog at https://www.livingdna.com/en/blog goes on:

We call this feature “views” as it allows you to look at your ethnic ancestry mix within different confidence ranges; Complete, Standard and Cautious.

For users who would have already received their results, they received their “Standard” view which may contain some unassigned ancestry. But now, by looking at the complete view, customers can see these unassigned areas. We’ve also added in a ‘cautions’ view which combines regions of genetically similar ancestry, providing our highest degree of certainty.

In the process of releasing views, we’ve made some small changes to our algorithms; this means that peoples results will be slightly updated, normally by around 1%, although a small number of customers may see much bigger changes in their mix.

I was impressed with the breakdown as it gives me clues where I should research for ancestors that appear in my family tree, but I know not from where they came. This is because they married into my identified line, but before census or BMD records and so they didn’t reveal which part of the world they hailed from!

Now I will redouble my efforts to find them in the records of the regions that share similar DNA.

 

LivingDNA ancestry

 

Check out the LivingDNA website as they have a limited time special offer on at the time of writing!

 

Disclosure: Links above are compensated affiliate links.

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The end of microfilms at Family Search

I was in The National Archives this week and I thought I’d pop over to the London FamilySearch Centre that is located inside the reading room at TNA in Kew.

On the desk, in front of the LDS staff was an announcement to the effect that FamilySearch is discontinuing their microfilm lending service on September 1, 2017 across the world.

They have announced that “the change is the result of significant progress in FamilySearch’s microfilm digitization efforts and the obsolescence of microfilm technology. Digital imaging has made it easier to find ancestors through the internet, mobile, and other technologies.”

So what this means for family history researchers across the globe is that very soon we will no longer be able to borrow microfilmed genealogical records from the Family History Library. The last day researchers can place an order for delivery to your local Family History Centre/Center is August 31, 2017.

It is true that the majority of the Family History Library’s microfilm vault has already been digitized and is online – or will be within a short time and they say that they hope to finish digitizing the records that they have permission to digitize, in 2020. This still means, however, that some of the films we will not be digitized because they fall foul of either contractual limitations, data privacy, or some other reason.
 
This is sad news for family historians who had used this rich resource.
Entrance to the FamilySearch vault in Salt Lake City
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