Early Military records online at TheGenealogist

 

News from TheGenealogist this weekend tells of new Military record releases. I am particularly interested to see if I can trace a man in the Waterloo Roll, so off to take a look!

 

This month TheGenealogist is pleased to announce it has added several new early military records. Joining the ever growing and fully searchable Military collection is:

  • The Waterloo Roll Call 1815

  • Battery Records of the Royal Artillery, 1716-1859

  • The Manchester Regiment, 63rd and 96th 1758-1883 Vol I and 1883-1922 Vol II

  • Certificate of Musters in the County of Somerset 1569

  • Four more Army Lists, from 1838 to 1886

Waterloo

The Waterloo Roll Call of 1815 enables researchers to find ancestors within a list of nearly 4,000 men, most of whom were officers present at the Battle of Waterloo in Belgium on June 18th 1815 under the Duke of Wellington – whose record we can find in this collection. You can search for your ancestors in ‘The Waterloo Roll Call’ using Title, Forename, Surname, Regiment, Rank, Decoration and Staff position.

MilitiaMany of our forefathers would have served in the British Army, and with the military known for their record keeping these can provide researchers with valuable information on ancestors. The earliest records in this new release are 16th century Militia Musters for Somerset. The Certificate of Musters in the County of Somerset 1569 contain names of Militiamen (soldiers raised from the civil population) and what role they carried out including archer, pikeman and light-horseman.

The Battery Records of the Royal Artillery 1716-1859 is a prime reference record containing tabulated Battery records, numerous useful historical notes, lists of various officers and more.

Manchester regFor Mancunian military forebears The Manchester Regiment 63rd and 96th 1758-1922 includes the succession of Colonels and an alphabetical roll of regimental officers from 1758 to 1923 showing dates of service with the Regiment, dates of promotion and date and reason for being struck off. With the centenary of the First World War these records can be used to find casualties of all ranks from “The Manchesters” in the Great War. With a list of Honours and Awards, including foreign, these digitised books also provide an interesting in-depth history of the regiment so that researchers can follow the postings of The Manchester Regiment and the action in which it took part.

Those researching Victorian soldiers will welcome the inclusion of several early Army Lists in this release for January 1838, December 1838, April 1886 and The Annual Army and Militia List 1855.

Image sources: https://commons.wikimedia.org

 

 

To search these and countless other useful family history records take a look at TheGenealogist now!

 

The Genealogist - UK census, BMDs and more online

Compensated affiliate links used in the post above http://paidforadvertising.co.uk/

Send to Kindle

We All Have Royal Ancestry

A guest article this week: We All Have Royal Ancestry – so are you on the Royals’ Christmas card list as a distant releative?

320px-The_British_royal_family_on_the_balcony_of_Buckingham_Palace

We All Have Royal Ancestry
By Christopher Tisch

One of the greatest thrills as we research our genealogy is discovering we are descended from royal bloodlines. The idea that some distant uncle was a king or noble is exciting and can make anyone feel special. The whole allure of royalty, besides the obvious money and power, is belonging to a small group of people having a high place in society. For some, being a distant part of this group means we’re finally one of the “in crowd.”

But before you go wearing a crown to work tomorrow, you should know that science has shown that royalty in your bloodlines really isn’t all that special. It turns out that more people have royal blood than you would think. Statistician Joseph Chang discovered that the bloodlines of prominent royal figures like Emperor Charlemagne have crossed over into literally every present-day European’s ancestry.

This doesn’t mean that Charlemagne had thousands of kids, but instead is an observation that, if you go back far enough, almost all bloodlines within a given megapopulation will come together around a common ancestor. The further back you go, the wider your family tree spreads, to the point that at some point about 1,000 years ago, “all individuals who have any descendants among the present-day individuals are actually ancestors of all present-day individuals,” Chang determined.

Translating that into plain English, what he’s saying is that the population of Europe 1,000 years ago was so much smaller than it is today that, statistically, every person that was alive then and had children will somehow fit into the family tree of any given European alive today. What that means to us is that if you’re European, then you are definitely descended from Charlemagne. Taadaa! We’re all royal.

So, is it just the Europeans who are guaranteed royal lines? Not even close. By expanding his mathematical model from covering only living Europeans to everyone else on the planet today, Chang discovered that every single person on earth today is related to the Egyptian queen Nefertiti.

Yet another study found that all living Europeans can be traced back to the same pair of people going back only 1,000 years. When you look at how long people have been on Earth, 1,000 years isn’t very long at all. This study also found that people living as far away from each other as Britain and Turkey (at their closest points, more than 1,300 miles and 8 countries apart) share enough DNA to prove they are direct relatives around 20% of the time.

“It underlines the commonality of all of our histories,” said UC Davis evolutionary biologist Graham Coop. “You don’t have to go back many generations to find that we’re all related to each other.”

To learn more, go to http://www.dnaspectrum.com

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Christopher_Tisch/1887490
http://EzineArticles.com/?We-All-Have-Royal-Ancestry&id=9057112

 

 


 

 

Find your elusive ancestors in the online and offline records. Discover where to look and what records sets to use in the English/Welsh family history course from The Family History Researcher Academy.

You can take advantage of a Special Offer Trial of just £1 for a month!

You’ll receive 4 modules plus bonus content by going to: http://www.familyhistoryresearcher.com/trialoffer/

 

OR to pay in US dollars simply Click this link:

http://www.familyhistoryresearcher.com/specialoffer

(Normal monthly subscription: £9.95 per month(or $14.00). Course length: 52 weekly downloadable tutorials to do at your own pace. You are free to cancel at any time.)

One month trial of the Family History Researcher Academy English/Welsh course
Click the Image to take a trial for only £1
Send to Kindle

Mark Herber’s collection of war memorial photos online

 

This announcement came out this week about a new website for family historians. One of the people behind it is Mark Herber, best known in the genealogy field for his very comprehensive book Ancestral Trails that was published, I think, in 1997 when I was still managing a bookshop.

 

War-Memorial.co.uk, is the brand new website dedicated to Photographing, Transcribing and preserving war memorial records for the future, has just launched online providing a unique service that allows the researcher to find their ancestor using the largest collection of combined War Memorial records and images currently available anywhere.

war-memorial-5-sm

This project is based on Mark Herber’s growing collection of war memorial photographs and personally checked transcriptions. It honours those men and women, who died or served our country in military conflict over the years and it already features over 20,000 detailed photographs of more than 1,200 memorials, commemorating over 270,000 people, with their names (and the memorial’s information about them) transcribed and indexed.

With regular additions of photographs, names and information to War-Memorial.co.uk expected as the months go by, War-Memorial.co.uk is the place to find your ancestors immortalised on the country’s war memorials.

Details that can be found in these memorial records include:

  • Name
  • Regiment, unit or ship
  • War or date of death
  • Rank and medals
  • Photograph of the War Memorial from multiple angles and zooms

War-Memorial.co.uk’s collection includes a very large number of records from the Boer War of 1899-1902 and WW1 and WW2, but it also includes memorials from as early as the 17th century up to very recent conflicts such as Northern Ireland and Afghanistan. Soldiers, sailors, aircrew and civilians are all featured – and not just those who died. Many men and women who served but survived also appear in the records.

Using the sophisticated search technology and just basic details you can locate full information on War Memorials on which men and women are commemorated, find more details about them (such as their regiments, ships, ranks and medals), discover the location of the War Memorial and see images of the memorial itself and a close up view of the name of your ancestor!

War-Memorial.co.uk is offering some great value options to suit every pocket starting at £5 for a month’s access, £9.95 quarterly, or take out a great value annual subscription at only £29.95.

With regular additions of photographs, names and information to War-Memorial.co.uk expected as the months go by. War-Memorial.co.uk is the place to find your ancestors immortalised on the country’s war memorials.

Example of finding your ancestor in the records

Here we find the unusual records of a Thomas Ambrose, who was killed in 1916 by a bomb from a German airship flying over Sudbury. The transcribed record details how he died and where he is commemorated, as shown below:

war-memorial-search

Each transcript brings up details of the memorial with overview images of the entire memorial so you can find your ancestor using just their name, locate their memorial and add the images and information to your family history records, or even plan your visit!

war-memorial

Click here to find out more: http://war-memorial.co.uk/

 


 

 

Find your elusive ancestors in the online and offline records. Discover where to look and what records sets to use in the English/Welsh family history course from The Family History Researcher Academy.

You can take advantage of a Special Offer Trial of just £1 for a month!

You’ll receive 4 modules plus bonus content by going to: http://www.familyhistoryresearcher.com/trialoffer/

 

OR to pay in US dollars simply Click this link:

http://www.familyhistoryresearcher.com/specialoffer

(Normal monthly subscription: £9.95 per month(or $14.00). Course length: 52 weekly downloadable tutorials to do at your own pace. You are free to cancel at any time.)

One month trial of the Family History Researcher Academy English/Welsh course
Click the Image to take a trial for only £1
Send to Kindle

All at Sea – WWI naval database launched

http://www.royalnavyrecordsww1.rmg.co.uk/

With the sea all around us it is no surprise that so many of our ancestors became sailors.

With the anniversary of the First World War has seen the launch online of a new database offering free access to thousands of service records for the Royal Navy.

Royal Navy First World War – Lives at Sea can be found at: http://www.royalnavyrecordsww1.rmg.co.uk/

With more than three and a half thousand naval officers and ratings who served in the Great War, this fully searchable collection represents a small percentage of the total number of service records to be found at The National Archives in ADM 188 and ADM 196. The work of transcribing and then uploading them to the site is an ongoing project.

Scanned copies of the naval service records are available online by going to dicsovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk

From their website we can see the argument for the importance of this project…

“This project will create the most significant online data resource for the study of the Royal Navy during the First World War. This unique resource also marks and commemorates the Royal Navy’s contribution to the First World War effort through the lives of those officers and ratings who served.

Our hope is that it will allow and promote a wide and diverse variety of research into the composition and operations of the Royal Navy during the War. This could be specifically in relation to individual officers and ratings through their personal and service histories, to wider studies, for instance, where men were recruited from, from which trades and to enable the creation of crew lists for ships and submarines for given dates.

Such lists do not survive for the First World War and so for the first time researchers will be able to place officers and ratings in naval battles of the War and study topics such as mortality rates, invalidity and its causes.

In addition the information derived from the database can be used as a platform for accessing other Royal Navy records including ships’ logs (ADM 53), ships’ photographs (ADM 176) and wider naval First World War operational records in (ADM 1, ADM 116, ADM 137) all at TNA, and First World War logs and journals (JOD), ship plans (SP) and photographs (HP) all at NMM.”

About the database  – what information is being captured

Personal and service details for every officer and rating who served in the First World War including:

  • Name
  • Date of Birth
  • Next of Kin
  • Service Number
  • Town/City of birth
  • County of birth
  • Country of birth
  • Occupation
  • Name of every ship/submarine/shore establishment served in (including from and to dates)
  • Rank or rating held on every ship/submarine/shore establishment served in
  • Which battle served in during the First World War, for example, (Heligoland Bight, Coronel, Falkland Islands 1914; Dogger Bank 1915; Jutland 1916; Otranto Straits, 1917).
  • Cause and date of discharge (for example, with regards to death, invalidity demobilisation).
  • Where buried or commemorated.
  • Medals awarded.

For some officers and ratings there may be more than one service record, sometimes with overlapping, duplicate and conflicting data. In such instances recourse will be made to published works, such as the Navy List, to verify information.

Read more at http://www.royalnavyrecordsww1.rmg.co.uk/#SXxpj6tKOQg8HUum.99

 


 

 

Find your elusive ancestors in the online and offline records. Discover where to look and what records sets to use in the English/Welsh family history course from The Family History Researcher Academy.

You can take advantage of a Special Offer Trial of just £1 for a month!

You’ll receive 4 modules plus bonus content by going to: http://www.familyhistoryresearcher.com/trialoffer/

 

OR to pay in US dollars simply Click this link:

http://www.familyhistoryresearcher.com/specialoffer

(Normal monthly subscription: £9.95 per month(or $14.00). Course length: 52 weekly downloadable tutorials to do at your own pace. You are free to cancel at any time.)

One month trial of the Family History Researcher Academy English/Welsh course
Click the Image to take a trial for only £1
Send to Kindle

English/Welsh family tree research

 

Genealogy Fast Track Secrets 40px

 

English or Welsh Family Tree Research.

Drawing up your English/Welsh family tree may be a simple matter for you.

Some readers of this blog, however, may be new to family history research. If you are in this situation and you don’t know where it is that you should look for your ancestors, then I have a tutorial guide that can help.

The problem could be that you just don’t know in which of the many genealogical records to head for when you are looking for your past family. Perhaps you have even made a start and tried the easy and obvious records and now wonder where else to look?

If your forebears came from England or Wales then, with a bit of knowledge of the various different record sets and resources that are out there, you should be able to easily put your family tree together and add your ancestors to its branches.

Just like all of us, at sometime, you may come up against an annoying brick wall in your research.

When you can’t find an elusive English or Welsh ancestor, don’t despair as quite often it will be possible to get around this logjam by simply making use of a different research tactic to tease out that oh so difficult to find ancestor – the one that you had thought had disappeared for good. Other times you may just need to use one of the many further record sets to break down your brick wall and so get your family tree research back on track.

The best way to discover your ancestors is usually to learn a bit more about all the many records, data research sites and various archives that are available to you. Think about taking a genealogy course. I have an extremely well received family history course that can quickly give you the tools to put you back on track – more about that in the guide.

Click Here

or you can copy and paste the URL below on this page to Download my guide:

Genealogy Fast Track Secrets.

Register your details and you can start right away!

http://noseygenealogist.com/fasttrackgenealogysecretsoptin.html

 

 

Send to Kindle