Spring Sale – Beginner’s English & Welsh Family History

Stuck in doors at this difficult time? Always wanted to make a start with your English or Welsh family tree?

The good news is that The Family History Researcher website has put it’s best selling 6 page concise Crib Sheet on sale for the next week!

Reduced to only £2 or $2.45 (US) you can now download this great resource for less than ever.

Find out which websites can be useful for discovering your English and Welsh ancestors. Recommendations include those that are free as well as paid sites. Reviews how using the websites of The National Archives, The National Library of Wales, County Record Offices, Society of Genealogists and more can help you with your research.

Introduces the researcher to the civil registration (vital records) census and going back before 1837 with parish records. Reveals where to look for the records of Nonconformist and Roman Catholics as well as the Church of England.

See box below, or go to: https://familyhistoryresearcher.com/fhrmembers/crib-sheet-beginning-english-and-welsh-family-history-april-2020/

Crib Sheet Beginning English and Welsh Family History – April 2020

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Changing times in the latest map release from TheGenealogist

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NEWS:

 

TheGenealogist has released the Colour Tithe Maps for Essex with full integration with its MapExplorer™. This release allows us to see the area in West Ham, Essex on which the ExCel centre now stands and to discover the changes from Victorian pasture land, to dock complex then Exhibition venue and now to the Nightingale Hospital as the Covid-19 emergency builds.

Essex Colour Tithe Maps

This versatile tool can give the family history researcher a fantastic insight into what our ancestors’ city, town or village looked like over a number of periods and can also help them to find an ancestor’s property. With the addition of georeferenced Colour Tithe Maps. TheGenealogist has also today released colour tithe maps for Essex – you can search these as normal or browse them on Map Explorer™. 

Joining the georeferenced Lloyd George Data Layer, Headstones and War Memorials, the Colour Tithe Maps are an important enhancement of the ever-expanding Map Explorer™.

  • The Map Explorer™ displays maps for historical periods up to the modern day.
  • Colour Tithe maps bring the early Victorian era to this innovative tool
  • Plots on the maps are linked to the apportionment books, enabling researchers to locate where their ancestors lived or worked

TheGenealogist has linked these highly detailed Tithe maps to the apportionment book records so providing researchers with the details of the plots, their owners and their occupiers at the time of the early Victorian survey. The coverage ranges from large estate owners to ordinary people occupying small plots such as a homestead or a cottage. Colour Tithe Maps make it easier for the researcher to understand the terrain as the streams, rivers, lakes, ponds, houses and trees are often highlighted in different colours. 

TheGenealogist’s Colour Tithe Maps now cover the counties of Buckinghamshire, Cumberland, Huntingdonshire, Middlesex, Northumberland, Rutland, Surrey, Westmorland, the City, North and East Ridings of Yorkshire along with the new addition this week of Essex. 

Subscribers to TheGenealogist’s Diamond membership can now view the latest colour or grayscale maps when using the Tithe & Landowner records.

TheGenealogist’s powerful Map Explorer™ has been developed to view these georeferenced historic maps overlaid on top of modern background maps including those from Ordnance Survey and Bing Street maps, as well as a satellite view. With the Map Explorer™, you can search for an ancestor’s property, discovering its site, even if the road has changed or is no longer there. 

Alternatively, using the Master Search on TheGenealogist, having found your forebear listed in the Tithe Records you can click through to the Map Explorer™ which will also show War Memorials or cemeteries on the various maps.

 

Read TheGenealogist’s article here: Essex Tithe Maps Reveal Ever Changing Landscape

 

 

About TheGenealogist

TheGenealogist is an award-winning online family history website, who put a wealth of information at the fingertips of family historians. Their approach is to bring hard to use physical records to life online with easy to use interfaces such as their Tithe and newly released Lloyd George Domesday collections. 

TheGenealogist’s innovative SmartSearch technology links records together to help you find your ancestors more easily. TheGenealogist is one of the leading providers of online family history records. Along with the standard Birth, Marriage, Death and Census records, they also have significant collections of Parish and Nonconformist records, PCC Will Records, Irish Records, Military records, Occupations, Newspaper record collections amongst many others.

TheGenealogist uses the latest technology to help you bring your family history to life. Use TheGenealogist to find your ancestors today!

 

 

*Disclosure: Please note this post contains affiliate links. This does not mean that you pay more just that I make a percentage on the sales from my links. The payments help me pay for the cost of running the site. You may like to read this explanation here:

http://paidforadvertising.co.uk/

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Take your research back before the census with the latest release from TheGenealogist

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NEWS:

TheGenealogist has released a collection of searchable Early Trade and Residential Directories that cover the years 1816-1839 to help find ancestors in the period before the usable census records begin.

Prior to 1841 all of the U.K. censuses were generally statistical: that is, mainly headcounts, with virtually no personal information such as names recorded and so family history researchers need to turn to a substitute to find out the address where their ancestors had lived. Trade and Residential Directories list names of tradespeople, prominent citizens and in some cases other residents of a town as well.

The-City-from-Bankside-by-Thomas-Miles-Richardson-c-1820

The City from Bankside by Thomas Miles Richardson, c.1820

 

Many of these directories will also give a good description of the town or area which can give family historians an interesting insight into the social history of their ancestors’ locality at the time. This information usually includes the main industry, topographical details, communication links with the surrounding towns by stage coach or railway, and details of local administration offices, post offices, the clergy, charities hospitals and schools.

These directory records have been digitised by TheGenealogist and made searchable by name, so they can help researchers to find their ancestors in the Georgian and very early Victorian period.

The early Trade and Residential Directories being released in this batch include volumes that cover the areas of Bedfordshire, Berkshire, Buckinghamshire, Cambridgeshire, Cornwall, Derby, Devonshire, Dorsetshire, Durham, Essex, Glasgow, Hampshire, London, Liverpool, Middlesex, Northumberland, Norfolk, Nottinghamshire and Suffolk.

List of Directories in this release:

Derby 1829 History, Gazetteer and Directory; Devonshire 1830 Pigot’s Directory; Durham 1828 White’s Directory; Essex 1832-1833 Pigot’s Directory; Glasgow 1831-1832 Post Office Directory; Lincolnshire 1826/7 Directory; Liverpool 1816 Gore’s Directory; London 1816 Post Office Directory; London 1819 Robson’s Directory; London 1822 Post Office Directory; London and Provincial 1823-1824 New Commercial Pigot Directory; London 1824 Post Office Directory; London 1826 Post Office Directory; London 1828 Robson’s Commercial Directory; London 1829 Robson’s Trades Directory; London 1831 Post Office Directory; London 1833 Robson’s Directory; London 1836 Post Office Directory; London 1837 Post Office Directory; London 1839 Post Office Directory; Norfolk 1830 Pigot’s Directory; Northumberland 1828 White’s Directory; Nottinghamshire 1832 White’s Directory; Suffolk 1830 Pigot’s Directory.

 

Find out more about directories and how they can help you research your ancestors on TheGenealogist here:

TheGenealogist.co.uk – Directories

 

*Disclosure: Please note this post contains affiliate links. This does not mean that you pay more just that I make a percentage on the sales from my links. The payments help me pay for the cost of running the site. You may like to read this explanation here:

http://paidforadvertising.co.uk/

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The National Archives Event in Kew – Using Migration Records

NEWS:

Talk and document display

Using examples of records and case studies relating to both immigrants and emigrants held in The National Archives at Kew (U.K.) collection, this talk will explain how to search for and interpret records such as passenger lists, passports, registration and naturalisation records.

The National Archives Event – Using Migration Records

This talk will be delivered by Roger Kershaw, Migration Records Specialist at The National Archives in the U.K.

Friday 24 April 2020 14:00 – 15:30

To book: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/using-migration-records-tickets-93922152687

Timings are indicative. Talk expected to last one hour, including 15 mins for audience Q&A.

TNA runs a range of events and exhibitions on a wide variety of topics. For more details, visit nationalarchives.gov.uk/whatson.

The National Archives logo

 

 

 

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New Property Records for Greenwich released by TheGenealogist

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Latest News:

TheGenealogist has just released over 57,700 individuals from the Greenwich area into its Lloyd George Domesday Survey Records on the Map Explorer™. These fully searchable property records enable researchers to find where ancestors from Greenwich lived in the 1910-1915 period. This release now brings the total coverage of Lloyd George Domesday Survey Records to over half a million individuals.

TheGenealogist adds property records 1910-1915
Lloyd George Domesday Survey of Greenwich from TheGenealogist

 

 

By using TheGenealogist’s powerful Map Explorer family history researchers searching for where their ancestors lived in the period before the First World War are able to see the actual plots for buildings and explore the district as it was in that period on large scale OS maps linked to the field books containing descriptions of the properties.

Researchers often have difficulty discovering where ancestors lived as road names can change over time. World War II Blitz bombing saw areas destroyed and these sites were altered during redevelopment, making them unrecognizable from what had been there before. Lanes and roads were often lost to build estates and office blocks. The changes over the years can mean that searching for where an ancestor lived using modern maps can be a frustrating experience, as they won’t pinpoint where old properties had once stood.

The Map Explorer™ benefits from a number of georeferenced historic map overlays and modern base maps, allowing users to see how the topography has changed over the years by simply sliding the opacity controls.

 

The Lloyd George Domesday Survey records are sourced from The National Archives and are being digitised by TheGenealogist.

 

  • TheGenealogist’s Lloyd George Domesday records link individual properties to extremely detailed maps used in 1910-1915
  • Full descriptions of each property with its valuation recorded in field books
  • Locate an address previously found in a census or street directory down to a specific house
  • Fully searchable by name, county, parish and street
  • The maps will zoom in to show the individual properties as they were in 1910-1915
  • Transparency sliders enable you to compare and contrast modern and historic street maps, change the base map displayed to satellite or hybrid to more clearly understand what the area looks like today
  • Overlay with a range of old maps to see the wider area as it had once been
  • Allows you to display county or parish boundaries
  • Searching for an ancestor identifies their property with a green pin
  • Check neighbouring properties by clicking the red pins and selecting ‘View Transcript’

 

Read the article: Greenwich property records reveal the lost past much changed by the blitz, bombs and the building of a historic landmark

 

About TheGenealogist

TheGenealogist is an award-winning online family history website, who put a wealth of information at the fingertips of family historians. Their approach is to bring hard to use physical records to life online with easy to use interfaces such as their Tithe and newly released Lloyd George Domesday collections.

TheGenealogist’s innovative SmartSearch technology links records together to help you find your ancestors more easily. TheGenealogist is one of the leading providers of online family history records. Along with the standard Birth, Marriage, Death and Census records, they also have significant collections of Parish and Nonconformist records, PCC Will Records, Irish Records, Military records, Occupations, Newspaper record collections amongst many others.

TheGenealogist uses the latest technology to help you bring your family history to life. Use TheGenealogist to find your ancestors today!

 

About The National Archives

The National Archives is one of the world’s most valuable resources for research and an independent research organisation in its own right. As the official archive and publisher for the UK government, and England and Wales they are the guardians of some of the UK’s most iconic national documents, dating back over 1,000 years. Their role is to collect and secure the future of the government record, both digital and physical, to preserve it for generations to come, and to make it as accessible and available as possible. The National Archives brings together the skills and specialisms needed to conserve some of the oldest historic documents as well as leading digital archive practices to manage and preserve government information past, present and future.

http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/  http://www.legislation.gov.uk/

For the latest stories, follow the Media Team on Twitter @TNAmediaofficer

 

 

 

*Disclosure: Please note this post contains affiliate links. This does not mean that you pay more just that I make a percentage on the sales from my links. The payments help me pay for the cost of running the site. You may like to read this explanation here:

http://paidforadvertising.co.uk/

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Mental Health on Record – The National Archives film

 

The Lunatic Asylum from Wikipedia

The Lunatic Asylum.  image from Wiki Commons

 

Have you found an ancestor in the records labelled as a Lunatic?

I know I did, and was a bit shocked to see that she was an inmate of the workhouse until she died some years later. Of course the workhouse was one of the places that people who couldn’t look after themselves would go before the birth of the National Health Service in Britain.

New Film: Mental Health on Record

This week The National Archives in the U.K. premiered a new film called ‘Mental Health on Record’. It is a stop-motion animation film made by a group of young people which explores how contemporary views on mental health can be used to interpret historical records from the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

Historical documents are used in the film to demonstrate how perceptions of mental health have changed. The film examines how words like ‘hysterical’, ‘lunatic’ and ‘eccentric’ would have been used in past times to refer to our ancestors, their cases often not being recognised as mental health issues

The documents used by the young film makers originate from a range of sources beyond health records, including the Prison Commission, Central Criminal Court and the War Office.

See: https://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/about/news/mental-health-on-record-released/

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Discover Your Ancestors with the newly released Vol 9

Last weekend I attended the very successful Family History Show, South West at the UWE Exhibition hall near Bristol. One of the stands there was for Discover Your Ancestors, for whom I am a regular writer. I was so pleased to see that the new Discover Your Ancestors Issue 9 had just come off the press and was available there and in the shops now! With articles on tracing your house history, the family history of the cast and the castle of Downton Abbey and items covering criminal gangs to criminal lunatics, it’s a read that’s hard to put down.

The quality of the glossy bookazine really is amazing and I was impressed with the treatment that the editor, Andrew Chapman, had given both my pieces and the other writer’s articles to make them so attractive on the page.

Discover Your Ancestors V9

This 196-page bookazine contains new in-depth articles, research advice, social and general history, ‘how to’ features, case studies, places in focus, and much more! It is ideal for both experienced researchers and those just starting out.

In this volume you will find features on:
Downton Abbey: the historic location, stars and their family histories
Charles Dickens 150th Anniversary
Celebrity Genealogies: Phoebe Waller-Bridge and Rowan Atkinson
Peaky Blinders & The Krays: the real history of organised crime gangs
DNA and how it can pinpoint ancestors’ locations
and much more!

Also included are over £170 of FREE resources! Including a free online research subscription and a voucher for a free subscription to the monthly online magazine, Discover Your Ancestors Periodical.

Pick up this new release from WHSmiths or go online to S&N Genealogy Supplies where you can also find Discover Your Ancestors Back Issues so you can complete your collection, Periodical Compendiums so you can get up to date with the monthly online magazine, as well as many Books and other new releases from Discover Your Ancestors, including the popular Seven Generation Log Book, 10 Generation Relationship Chart and Birth Year from Census Date Calculator.

https://genealogysupplies.com/

 

Disclosure: I am a regular writer for both the annual print bookazine as well as the monthly online Discover Your Ancestors Periodical

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New RAF Operations Record Books released on TheGenealogist

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NEWS:

This is the first time that these RAF records are fully searchable by name, aircraft, location and many other fields, making it easier to find your aviation ancestors.

 

In a release of over half a million records, this is the first batch of RAF Operations Records Books (ORBs) to join TheGenealogist’s ever-expanding military records collection.

 

The operations records books are for squadrons primarily after the First World War but there are a few early squadron records from 1911 to 1918.

These documents tell the stories of these brave aircrew who battled against the odds and give insights into their everyday lives. You can use the collection to follow an airman’s war time experiences from these fully searchable Air Ministry operations record books which cover various Royal Air Force, dominion and Allied Air Force squadrons that came under British Command. The AIR 27 records allow the family history researcher a fascinating insight into their relatives serving in a number of wartime air force units.

In the last week we have been sad to hear of the death of the last surviving Battle of Britain ace pilot from World War Two. Wing Cdr Paul Farnes died aged 101 a few days ago and so it is, therefore, poignant that as one of the last from among the 3,000 airmen – known as The Few – who had defended Britain’s skies in 1940 he appears in this release of RAF records from TheGenealogist.

 

Wing Commander Farnes had six confirmed enemy aircraft destroyed, two shared destroyed, two possible destroyed and 11 damaged in his impressive war time tally making him qualify as an ace (a pilot who shot down five or more enemy planes).

Wing Commander Paul Farnes  Oem89 [CC BY-SA (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)]

 

The records provide summaries of events and can reveal the death of aviators, crashes, as well as less traumatic details such as weather and places patrolled by the planes and where the squadrons were based as the war wore on. As aircrew personnel are named in these reports, those wanting to follow where an ancestor had been posted to and what may have happened to them will find these records extremely informative.

Sgt P.C. Farnes first “kill” recorded in the Operations Record Book for 501 Squadron on TheGenealogist

 

Of value to researchers are the duties recorded in these documents so that you can find the assignments the men took part in. This includes Bombing, Convoy Escort, Submarine Hunt, Attack Docks & Shipping, Dive Bombing Raids and more.

 

Use these records to:

  • Add colour to an aircrewman’s story
  • Read the war movements of personnel in air force units
  • Discover if a pilot, navigator, radio operator or gunner is mentioned in the action
  • Find if an airman is listed for receiving an Honour or an Award
  • Note the names of squadron members wounded, killed, or did not return
  • Easily search these National Archives records and images

 

This expands TheGenealogist’s extensive Military records collection.

 

Read my article: RAF Operations Books build a picture of WWII aircrew ancestors action

These records and many more are available to Diamond subscribers of TheGenealogist.co.uk

 

 

*Disclosure: Please note this post contains affiliate links. This does not mean that you pay more just that I make a percentage on the sales from my links. The payments help me pay for the cost of running the site. You may like to read this explanation here:

http://paidforadvertising.co.uk

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Next Saturday – 6th February 2020 Family History Show at Bristol, UK

NEWS:

Many genealogists and family history researchers, myself included, will be heading over to Bristol for The Family History Show, South West in just a weeks’ time!

The show takes place on this coming Saturday 8th February 2020 at UWE Exhibition Centre, with two Large Lecture Theatres with Free TalksFree Ask the Experts Area, Societies, Local Archives and Ministry of Defence stands, Free Goody Bag worth over £8 on entry, Free Parking and Free minibus from Station.

Family history show at University of the West of England Exhibition Centre
University of the West of England Exhibition Centre

 

Don’t miss the Family History Show’s Early Bird Offer, Two Tickets for £8, saving £4 on the door price, which you can claim here.

Not in the South West? Don’t worry, they are also coming to York in June and London in September.

Free talks will be held throughout the day, from a variety of speakers.

Theatre 1

10:30 Breaking down brick walls in your family history research
with Mark Bayley, Online Genealogy Expert

 

How to resolve stumbling blocks in your family history research using new and unique search strategies to find those missing relatives. Includes searching for a family using advanced search techniques. The talk also covers unique data sets.

11:30 The Genetic Genealogy Revolution: how DNA testing is transforming family history research
with Debbie Kennett – DNA Expert & Writer

 

DNA testing is a powerful tool, it can help to break through brick walls and solve family history mysteries. But DNA testing can also produce surprises. Debbie looks at how different tests work and discusses some of the fascinating stories discovered through DNA testing.

12:30 Tracing Your Military Ancestors
with Chris Baker – Military Expert & Professional Researcher 

Chris draws on his experience from researching thousands of soldiers to explore what can be found when looking for a military ancestor.

13:30 Breaking down brick walls in your family history research
with Mark Bayley, Online Genealogy Expert

 

How to resolve stumbling blocks in your family history research using new and unique search strategies to find those missing relatives. Includes searching for a family using advanced search techniques. The talk also covers unique data sets.

Theatre 2

11:00 Tips & Tricks for Online Research
with Keith Gregson – Professional Researcher & Social Historian

 

Keith shares top tips & techniques for finding elusive ancestors, illustrated by some fascinating case studies. He is both a popular and academic historian with a range of publications stretching over the past 40 years.

12:00 Breaking down brick walls in your family history research
with Mark Bayley, Online Genealogy Expert

 

How to resolve stumbling blocks in your family history research using new and unique search strategies to find those missing relatives. Includes searching for a family using advanced search techniques. The talk also covers unique data sets.

13:00 Tracing Rural Ancestors
with Else Churchill – Professional Researcher & Social Historian

 

English ancestors lived in rural communities working the land. We may know nothing more about them other than the designation of labourer shown in the parish registers or census records. This talk will look at other records and ways of discovering more about rural ancestors and the communities they inhabited. It will look (inter alia) at records and resources from 1750-1950, such as parish surveys and reports on agricultural life, land and other tax records, land holding, friendly societies, school and poor law records.

14:00 Dating Family Photos from the 1840s to the 1940s
with Jayne Shrimpton – Photo Expert & Fashion Historian

 

Jayne Shrimpton explains how to date your family photographs, from formal Victorian studio portraits to 20th-century snapshots. She’ll also discuss key fashion dating tips and cover the main photographic formats of the Victorian era.

 

Perhaps I’ll see some of you there?

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Celebrating Burns night and Scottish Ancestry

Disclosure: Please note this post contains affiliate links.

 

Its Burn’s night  tonight and so I began thinking about how my Scottish ancestors may have celebrated this important anniversary.

Burns Night falls on 25 January every year, the date having been chosen to coincide with the poet’s birthday, who was born on 25 January 1759.  According to Wikipedia Robert Burns, also known familiarly as Rabbie Burns, the National Bard, Bard of Ayrshire and the Ploughman Poet and various other names and epithets, was a Scottish poet and lyricist. He is widely regarded as the national poet of Scotland and is celebrated worldwide. See: Wikipedia

To celebrate this anniversary I have sat down with a copy of Chris Paton’s new book: Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church & State Records. Pen & Sword November 2019

My Scotts ancestors are a fascinating bunch and so in the hope of being able to trace a bit more about them I have turned to the latest book written by the respected genealogist and writer who runs Scotland’s Greatest Story research service.

 

BOOK REVIEW

Book: Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church & State Records

It always bodes well when just a few pages into a genealogy book that the author manages to capture my attention by expanding my knowledge with a number of facts that I had not known and which allow me to experience that ‘light-bulb’ moment when I think: Ah that explains why…so and so. That was exactly what happened to me when reading this new Scottish ancestry book from Chris Paton, the well respected author and professional genealogist.

I have sometimes wondered why I had found an ancestor born on the continent in an European country, but who also appears within the Scottish records in Edinburgh. This publication has finally cleared it up for me. As the book points out, as well as the normal  civil records, that you would expect to find recorded at the General Record Office for Scotland (GROS), there are also a number of Minor Records that relate to Scots residing or working overseas in certain capacities, as well as those born at Sea (until a UK based authority took over births at sea in 1874).

Another point that I had not been fully aware of was that adoption in Scotland was not placed on a legal footing until the Adoptions of Children (Scotland) Act 1930 came into force. The book taught me that the NRS Register of Adoptions can only be consulted in person at the ScotlandsPeople Centre and it gave me other helpful details about researching adopted people in Scotland.

I was very interested to learn about the differences between Regular and Irregular Marriages and to understand the differences between a marriage by declaration, a betrothal followed by intercourse and a marriage by habit and repute. Again, to understand that there are a number of minor records of marriage that covered Scots people abroad I thought could be important when researching some of our ancestors living in foreign countries.

A fact  that I had not know until I read this book was that uniquely, in the British Isles, Scotland has a Register of Corrected Entries for its civil records. This would allow a name to be put right if it had been given incorrectly to the registrar at the time of registration. This seems so sensible as I am aware of a member of my family whose registered name was misspelt by her father when he registered it in the English system, with the records remaining incorrect to this day!

I was fascinated to read the brief history of the Church in Scotland, especially as I have a Scots ancestor who was an Episcopalian Bishop in Perthshire and now I see why his family were supporters of the Jacobite cause in 1745-46. Other ancestors of mine from Scotland were Covenantors and so I have been given a better understanding of their religious leaning. Previously I had only noted them in the records where I had found them, be it in Church of Scotland parishes, the Scottish Episcopal Church or others. I had not fully understood the various factions that had broken away from the State Kirk and how, even in the branch of my family tree that was Scots, that my ancestors may have had different views on religion from each other.

When looking at the Old Parish Records, which I have done for a number of my ancestors who were married before civil registration took place in January 1855, Chris Paton suggests in this book that we researchers should always consult both the marriage register and the Kirk session minutes “even if there appears to be nothing out of the ordinary with the marriage record”. His example of a couple who tried to get away with banns being read twice on one Sunday, because of their hurry to be married before the baby was born, made me smile.

The advice that Church of Scotland registers may also contain the names of dissenting couples whose banns are being read is yet another example of how educating this volume was for me. The author suggests that we pay careful attention to the name of the minister that performed their marriage as this can reveal the denomination of the church that the wedding actually took place within. Should the minister’s name differ from the incumbent of the Parish Church, in whose register the banns had been published, then the minister’s name can lead us to find the nonconformist church or chapel where the marriage took place.

There is so much more that I could have brought up in this short review that I found interesting in this book, from understanding Land Tenure and the chapters on Inheritance and Law and Order.

I thoroughly recommend that anyone with Scots heritage get hold of Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church & State Records as I am sure you wont be disappointed by it!

https://www.pen-and-sword.co.uk/Tracing-Your-Scottish-Ancestry-through-Church-and-State-Records-Paperback/p/16848?aid=1101

 

 

*Disclosure: Please note this post contains affiliate links. This does not mean that you pay more just that I make a percentage on the sales from my links. The payments help me pay for the cost of running the site. You may like to read this explanation here:

http://paidforadvertising.co.uk

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