Parish Records for All of Wales Launched Online

Disclosure: Please note this post contains affiliate links.*

 

BREAKING  NEWS:

 

TheGenealogist are launching the complete set of all Anglican records for Wales held by the consortium of Welsh archives on Friday 23rd October. This release contains 8 million Parish Records, listing over 14.5 million individuals, with images of the original registers. 

Mark Bayley, Head of Online Content at TheGenealogist said:

“We are very excited to be releasing parish records for all 13 historic Welsh counties.” He went on to say:

“We’re thankful for the input of Welsh records experts from the archives, to make sure that we have accurate parish and place names. This will make it much easier for researchers to find records that they may have experienced difficulties with trying to find elsewhere. 

“TheGenealogist’s keyword search makes it surprisingly easy to find the record you’re after and SmartSearch allows you to find families in the registers.

“These records compliment our nonconformist records for Wales which include Methodists,  Quakers and more, giving researchers the ultimate resource for finding their Welsh ancestors’ vital events.”

St Michael’s Church, Betws-Y-Coed
St Michael’s Church, Betws-Y-Coed as featured in the records

This release includes all historic Welsh counties:

Anglesey, Brecknockshire, Caernarfonshire, Cardiganshire, Carmarthenshire, Denbighshire, Flintshire, Glamorgan, Merionethshire, Monmouthshire, Montgomeryshire, Pembrokeshire and Radnorshire.

 

Kim Collis, West Glamorgan County Archivist, says on behalf of all the Welsh archives contributing their parish records:

We are delighted that TheGenealogist is releasing these records to a wider audience. Being able to access them from the comfort of your own home, especially during the current situation, is of great benefit.

“For this release, we’ve painstakingly gone through the metadata, improving all the place names in this record set, recording chapels of ease, parent parishes of modern parishes, and variant spellings in the English and Welsh languages. This will mean that searches for your ancestor in the parish records, which previously might have turned up no results, will have a much greater chance of finding them for you.

“If you’ve previously struggled to find your ancestors’ Welsh Parish Records, I’d really encourage you to search these records.”

 

To find out more about Welsh Parish Records and this release, visit TheGenealogist.co.uk/welsh-parish-records/

 

This release has been made possible by the participation of the following archives:-

Anglesey Archives, Carmarthenshire Archive Service, Ceredigion Archives, Conwy Archive Services, Denbighshire Archives, Flintshire Record Office, Glamorgan Archives, Gwent Archives, Gwynedd Archives Service, Pembrokeshire Archives and Local Studies, Powys Archives and West Glamorgan Archive Service.

 

Who Do You Think You Are? S17 - Ruth Jones - (C) Wall to Wall Media Ltd - Photographer: Stephen Perry
Who Do You Think You Are? S17 – Ruth Jones – (C) Wall to Wall Media Ltd – Photographer: Stephen Perry

Ruth Jones will be searching for her Welsh roots in
Who Do You Think You Are? airing on Monday 26th October on BBC One. TheGenealogist has found her ancestors in this new collection.

Read about it here (WARNING: Contains spoilers) Featured articles: Ruth Jones Who Do You Think You Are?

 

 

 

 

*Disclosure: Please note this post contains affiliate links. This does not mean that you pay more just that I make a percentage on the sales from my links. The payments help me pay for the cost of running the site. You may like to read this explanation here:

http://paidforadvertising.co.uk/

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The Society of Genealogists’ Live Online Events for November to help trace your family history.

 

News:

This list, written by the Society of Genealogists, has some great Zoom talks for those with British Ancestors. I think I’ll sign up to some of them myself. Here is what they plan:

The Society of Genealogists (SoG) is pleased to offer the following Live Online Events taking place in November to help you trace your family history.  

 

Society of Genealogists website

Join the Society of Genealogists on one of their Live Zoom Events, the application is free and easy to use. If you have not attended one of the SoG’s online talks before, more information can be found on their website

 

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Saturday, 7 November 10:30 – Your Buckinghamshire Ancestors

Buckinghamshire has a varied and interesting history. It retains beautiful countryside, especially the Chiltern Hills which are an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. After the Industrial Revolution, Wolverton became known for building railway carriages, while furniture and paper industries grew in the south. The county was famous for its lace industry, giving work to women and children.

Antony Marr looks at the historic County of Buckinghamshire – its history, geography and ancestry. Antony then offers advice and lots of advice to help you research your Buckinghamshire ancestors using the amazing resources available in the County and elsewhere.

A one-hour talk with Antony Marr, cost £10.00/£5.00 SoG members

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Saturday, 7 November 16:00-17:45 – My Ancestor was in the Census – Well they should have been!

An up-to-date look at what census material is available online as well as covering the reasons that you may not find that ancestor may not be there. In this tutorial, we will have an extended Q&A session, so bring your questions along.

A tutorial with John Hanson, cost £16.00/£8.00 SoG members

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Wednesday, 11 November 14:00 – SoG Orientation:

Name Rich Sources that Supplement Parish Registers before 1837 in England and Wales

A one-hour talk with Else Churchill, cost £10.00/£5.00 SoG members

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Saturday, 14 November 10:30 – Death and Taxes: Understanding the Death Duty Registers

One of family history’s best kept secrets – records of death duty payments.

Many of us have found our ancestors’ wills and know that they can often give us really valuable information about our family. But very few of us have thought about looking at related records for death duties. For more than 100 years, from 1796 to 1903, the Inland Revenue maintained a series of registers recording these payments. The National Archives now hold the registers, waiting for us to search them.

In this talk, Dave Annal tells us all about them. He covers what’s in the surviving records. Then he describes how to use them to uncover fascinating facts about the lives and times of our 19th century ancestors.

A one-hour talk with Dave Annal, cost £10.00/£5.00 SoG members

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Saturday, 14 November 16:00 – Nonconformity in Wales

Are records relating to your Welsh ancestors missing from Parish Registers? The answer could lie in them being chapel members. The 1851 Religious Census in Wales revealed that almost 80% of the population worshipped as part of non-conformist congregations.

We will examine online and offline resources available in researching Welsh non-conformity, be it Baptist, Methodist, Presbyterian, Unitarian, Congregationalist or Society of Friends. Non-conformist worship in Wales has been a feature of Welsh culture for hundreds of years – open-air revival meetings; song and culture celebrated at Gymanfa Ganu and the Eisteddfod – the chapel has been the core of many communities in a uniquely Welsh way.

Understanding how our Welsh ancestors worshipped is an essential key to our family histories.

A one-hour talk with Gill Thomas, cost £10.00/£5.00 SoG members

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Wednesday, 18 November 14:00 – Getting the Most from the Society Library Catalogue (SOGCAT)

Join Else Churchill for an interesting talk on SoGCAT, the Society of Genealogists’ online library catalogue. The SoG Library holds about 135,000 items. Where do you start to find information on your ancestors? SoGCAT lists what we hold. So learning how to use it gives you a huge getting started benefit. In this talk, Else will provide you with lots of information on how to use SOGCAT and what it holds to further your research.

A one-hour talk with Else Churchill, the Genealogist at the Society. Places are free and go very quickly, so please book your place in advance.

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Saturday, 21 November 10:30 – The Parish Chest

Discover the importance of the parish – the unit of local government into the 19th century in the lives of our ancestors. Find out how the parish worked, what records were generated and where to find them. Learn how to use such records in family history, local history and house history research.

A one-hour talk with Gill Blanchard, cost £10.00/£5.00 SoG members

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Saturday, 21 November 14:00- Online Resources for Property and Taxation

A look at the wide variety of records available online for ownership or occupation of land or a house.

Beyond civil registration, parish and census records there are few genealogical sources that cover a significant percentage of the population. But property and property-based taxation and electoral records name all those who own, or even just rent, property over a certain value. These sources can not only provide information on wealth and social status but even point to specific buildings or pieces of land owned or occupied by an ancestor.

This talk will look at the range of property-related records available online, to help you discover more about your ancestors from the Middle Ages to 1918, and to unearth the information they can provide for your family history.

A one-hour talk with Peter Christian, cost £10.00/£5.00 SoG members

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Wednesday, 25 November 14:00 – Tracing Brewery & Publican Ancestors

Until fairly recently the public house in its various guises was a centre of the community and innkeepers were often respected figures locally. In addition most towns and villages had a brewery or two providing beer to slake the throats of everybody from princes to paupers.

In this talk Simon Fowler discusses the major sources you need to use if you have a publican or brewer on your family tree. Simon also looks at the changing nature of the tavern from the simple beer house to gaudy gin palace.

Bring your own Beer!

A one-hour talk with Simon Fowler, cost £10.00/£5.00 SoG members

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Thursday, 26 November 14:00- Making your Genealogy more Credible & Useful to Others

Genealogy needs to be shared. It serves no point otherwise.

For those who want to use your work, you offer a huge benefit if you can give some assurance that it is of sound quality. The facts you include need to be seen as coming from reliable sources that can be checked. So assurance depends on you stating where your facts have come from and providing a reference to where you found them.

In this one-hour talk, Ian Waller explains that referencing is critical. Cost £10.00/£5.00 SoG members

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Saturday, 28 November 10:30 – My Ancestor Came from Birmingham

Has your family history taken you to Birmingham? Maybe your ancestors were ‘Brummies born and bred’ or maybe they only spent some of their lives in Birmingham.

Join Doreen Hopwood as she explores and explains the numerous family history sources available so that you can discover how your ancestors lived, worked and played in ‘The City of a Thousand Trades’.

A one-hour talk with Doreen Hopwood. Cost £10.00/£5.00 SoG members

 

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Saturday, 28 November 14:00 – Madness, Mania and Melancholia: the Mental Health of our Ancestors

The history of mental ill-health is poorly understood and many of those who were labelled as ‘idiots’, ‘imbeciles’ or ‘lunatics’ in the past would have a very different diagnosis today.

This presentation looks at the history of reactions to and the treatment of those who we would now recognise as being mentally ill, or as having a learning disability. It also investigates the institutions where sufferers might be held and the sources we can use to find out more about these, often forgotten, members of our family.

A one-hour talk with Dr Janet Few, cost £10.00/£5.00 SoG members

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All events must be pre-booked through the Society of Genealogists website and SoG members should remember to login first, to receive the member’s discounted price.

Join the SoG at one of their Live Zoom Events, the application is free and easy to use. If you have not attended one of their online talks before, more information can be found on their website

 

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New release: 1.54 million individuals in Norfolk Parish Records with images

Disclosure: Please note this post contains affiliate links.*

 

 

LATEST NEWS

TheGenealogist has added over 1.54 million individuals to their Norfolk Parish Record Collection and so increasing the coverage of this Eastern English county for family researchers to find their ancestors’ baptisms, marriages and burial records. 

St Mary's Sandringham
St Mary’s Sandringham

These records are released in association with the Norfolk Record Office and have the benefit of high quality images to complement the transcripts, making them a valuable resource for those with ancestors from this area.

This new addition to the ever growing Parish Records collections on TheGenealogist are for fully searchable records of church registers from parishes in Norfolk. With records that reach back to the mid 16th century, this release allows family historians to find the names of forebears, their parents’ forenames, the father’s occupation (where noted), and the parish that the event took place in. Parish Records are one of the most important records for family historians to use when researching our ancestors, as they cover vital events before the introduction of civil registration for England and Wales in 1837.

This latest addition brings the total number of individuals in the parish records for Norfolk on TheGenealogist to over 11.5 million.

 

Example from the Parish of Sandringham in Norfolk

As an example we can find the one time owner of the Sandringham estate, many years before it became the royal residence that it is today. In the Elizabethan era a manor was built on what is the site of the present house. By the 18th century, it had come into the possession of the Hoste Henley family who were descendants of Dutch refugees. In 1771 Henry Cornish Henley cleared the site to build a Georgian mansion, Sandringham Hall. 

Using the Parish Records on TheGenealogist we are able to find the burial record for this gentleman and see that it was in 1773. It would seem that Henley died before the House was completed and so then it passed to his son, who would eventually sell it to a neighbour.

Burial transcript for Henry Cornish Henley November 1773 at St Mary Magdalene, Sandringham
Burial transcript for Henry Cornish Henley November 1773 at St Mary Magdalene, Sandringham
Entry in the Parish Burial Register at Sandringham for Henry Cornish Henley, November 1773
Entry in the Parish Burial Register at Sandringham for Henry Cornish Henley, November 1773

These new parish records are available as part of the Diamond Subscription at TheGenealogist.

This new release covers the following parishes: Acle, Alby, Aldborough, Aldeby, Alderford, Antingham, Ashwellthorpe, Ashwicken with Leziate, Aslacton, Aylmerton, Aylsham, Babingley, Bacton, Banham, Banningham, Barford, Barney, Barton Bendish St Andrew and St Mary with All Saints, Bebingley, Beechamwell (alias Beachamwell), Beeston Regis, Belaugh, Billingford, Bixley, Blakeney, Blickling, Blofield, Bodney, Booton, Boughton, Bracon Ash, Bradfield, Brampton, Brancaster, Braydeston, Breckles, Briston, Brooke, Brundall, Buckenham, Bunwell, Burgh St Margaret and Billockby, Burgh St Peter, Burlingham St Edmund, Burnham Deepdale, Caister next Yarmouth, Caistor St Edmund with Markshall, Calthorpe, Carleton Rode, Castle Acre, Castle Rising, Castleacre, Caston, Chedgrave, Clippesby, Cockley Cley, Cockthorpe, Colkirk and Colkirk with Oxwick, Colney, Coltishall, Corpusty, Costessy, Cromer, Crownthorpe, Croxton, Denver, Dersingham, Dickleburgh with Langmere, Didlington, Diss, Docking, Downham Market, Drayton, Dunston, Earlham St Anne with St Elizabeth, Earlham St Mary and Earlham with Bowthorpe, East Carleton, East Dereham, East Tuddenham, Eaton St Andrew and Christchurch, Eccles, Edgefield, Edingthorpe, Erpingham, Fakenham, Felthorpe, Fersfield, Field Dalling, Filby, Flitcham, Flordon, Fordham, Foulsham, Framingham Earl, Freethorpe, Fundenhall, Gately, Gayton, Gayton Thorpe, Gaywood with Bawsey and Mintlyn, Geyton Thorpe, Gimingham, Gissing, Glandford, Great Ellingham, Great Hautbois, Great Hockham with Little Hockham, Great Massingham, Great Melton, Great Moulton St Michael with Little Moulton, Great Plumstead, Great Snoring, Great Witchingham with Little Witchingham, Great Yarmouth, Great Yarmouth St Andrews, Great Yarmouth St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth St Peter, Gresham, Grimston, Griston, Guestwick, Hackford, Hackford with Whitwell, Haddiscoe, Hales, Hampstone, Hapton, Hardley, Hargham, Hassingham, Haveringland, Heacham, Heckingham, Heigham Holy Trinity, Heigham St Barnabas with St Bartholomew, Heigham St Philip, Heigham St Thomas, Hellesdon, Hempnall, Hempstead by Holt, Hempton, Hevingham, Hickling, Hillington, Hingham, Hockering, Hockwold cum Wilton, Holme Hale, Holme next the Sea, Holt, Honingham, Horning, Horsford, Horsham St Faith and Newton St Faith, Howe, Howe with Little Poringland, Hunstanton St Edmund, Ickborough, Illington, Ingworth, Itteringham, Kelling, Kempston, Ketteringham, Kilverstone, King’s Lynn St John the Evangelist, King’s Lynn St Margaret with St Nicholas, Kirby Bedon, Kirstead with Langhale, Knapton, Lakenham (old) St John, Lakenham St Alban, Lammas with Little Hautbois, Langley, Limpenhoe, Lingwood, Little Barningham, Little Cressingham, Little Ellingham, Little Massingham, Little Plumstead, Little Snoring, Little Walsingham, Little Witchingham, Ludham, Martham, Mattishall, Mautby, Merton, Mile Cross St Catherine, Morley St Botolph with St Peter, Morningthorpe, Morton, Morton On The Hill, Moulton St Mary, Mulbarton, Mundesley, Narborough, Needham, New Buckenham, New Catton Christ Church, New Catton St Luke, New Lakenham St Mark, Newton Flotman, North Creake, North Elmham, North Lopham, North Tuddenham, North Walsham, North Wootton, Northwold, Norton Subcourse, Norwich St Andrew, Norwich St Augustine, Norwich St Benedict, Norwich St Catherine Mile Cross, Norwich St Clement with St Edmund, Norwich St Etheldreda, Norwich St George Colegate, Norwich St Giles, Norwich St Helen, Norwich St James with Pockthorpe, Norwich St John de Sepulchre, Norwich St John Timberhill with All Saints and St Michael at Thorn, Norwich St Julian, Norwich St Martin at Oak, Norwich St Martin at Palace, Norwich St Mary Coslany, Norwich St Mary in the Marsh, Norwich St Mary Magdalene with St James the Great with Pockthorpe, Norwich St Michael Coslany, Norwich St Paul, Norwich St Peter Mancroft, Norwich St Peter Parmentergate, Norwich St Saviour, Norwich St Stephen, Oby, Old Buckenham, Old Catton, Old Lakenham (St John with All Saints), Ormesby St Margaret with Scratby, Oulton, Overstrand, Oxwick All Saints, Paston, Poringland, Postwick, Pulham St Mary Magdalene Alias Pulham Market, Quidenham, Rackheath, Raveningham, Redenhall with Harleston and Wortwell, Reepham with Kerdiston, Ridlington, Ringstead St Andrew, Ringstead St Peter, Rollesby, Roughton, Roydon, Runcton Holme with South Runcton and Wallington, Runton, Saham Toney, Sandringham, Saxthorpe, Scottow, Scoulton, Sea Palling, Sedgeford, Seething, Shelfanger, Sheringham, Shimpling, Shingham, Shipdham, Shouldham, Shropham, Sidestrand, Snetterton, Snettisham, South Lynn All Saints, Southrepps, Spixworth, Sporle with Palgrave, Sprowston and Beeston St Andrew, Stalham, Stanhoe with Barwick, Stiffkey, Stoke Holy Cross, Stow Bedon, Stradsett, Strumpshaw, Suffield, Sutton, Swaffham, Swafield, Swainsthorpe, Swannington, Swanton Abbot, Tacolneston, Talconeston, Tharston, Thetford St Cuthbert, Thetford St Mary, Thetford St Peter, Thompson, Thorpe Abbotts, Thorpe Episcopi, Thorpe Hamlet, Thorpe Market, Thorpe next Haddiscoe, Threxton, Thurlton, Thurne with Ashby and Oby, Thwaite All Saints, Titchwell, Tivetshall St Mary and St Margaret, Toft Monks, Toftrees, Tottenhill, Tottington, Trowse, Trunch, Watlington, Watton, Weeting, Wells next the Sea, Wendling, Wereham, West Lexham, West Lynn, West Newton with Appleton, West Tofts, Westacre, Weston Longville, Weybourne, Wheatacre, Wickmere with Wolterton, Wilby, Winfarthing, Winterton with East Somerton, Witton (near Blofield), Witton (near North Walsham), Wolferton, Wood Dalling, Wood Norton, Woodton, Wormegay, Worthing, Wreningham, Wymondham.

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Jodie Whittaker, David Walliams, Liz Carr and Ruth Jones take part in 2020’s ‘Who Do You Think You Are?’

NEWS:

Produced by Wall to Wall, the two-time BAFTA award-winning genealogy show Who Do You Think You Are? returns to BBC One in the UK this October with another star-studded line-up.

 

The celebrities set to unravel their family history in this four-part series of the UK’s Who Do You Think You Are? will include: Jodie Whittaker, who faces some fraught family history; David Walliams, who uncovers a relative’s traumatic experience during WWI and learns that entertaining runs in the family; Liz Carr, who investigates aancestors role in an attempted murder; and Ruth Jones, who unearths a family connection to the origins of the National Health Service.

Jodie Whittaker
Jodie Whittaker

Doctor Who and Broadchurch star Jodie Whittaker learns the poignant reality behind a family myth surrounding her great uncle’s sacrifice in WWI while unearthing some uncomfortable truths about her great-great grandfather in Yorkshire. 

Jodie Whittaker says: “Who Do You Think You Are? took me on an incredible journey through some of my family history. I discovered people and events that I had no idea existed before this. I was lucky to go home and see my Mum and Dad, lucky to see places I’d never been to before, and lucky to meet and shake hands with (!) some wonderful and intelligent people whose insight into history blew my mind. And only in February did I embark on this journey, and knowing where we are now, it feels even more special to have had this adventure.”

 

David Walliams
David Walliams

From his home town in Surrey to the First World War Battlefields in Belgium, actor, comedian and television personality David Walliams delights in discovering a great-great grandfather who, after becoming blind, forged a career as a travelling entertainer. Walliams also uncovers a more tragic story surrounding his paternal great grandfather’s experiences following WWI.

David Walliams says: “I’m delighted to have taken part in the series. I started off the journey knowing very little about my ancestry. In making the programme I found out lots of family history I would never would have learned of. I was pleased to discover that being an entertainer runs in the family.”

 

Liz Carr
Liz Carr

More Great War history is uncovered by Silent Witness actor and activist Liz Carr, who learns of her paternal grandfather’s experiences in the Royal Navy’s Northern Patrol. Carr also travels to Co. Armagh, Northern Ireland, and gets forensic, exposing an ancestor’s role in an attempted murder.

Liz Carr says: “I’ve watched Who Do You Think You Are? over the years so to be selected to have the show research my family history has been a wonderfully surreal experience. An armchair genealogist, my mum has dragged us around graveyards in search of our ancestors but to no avail so I’m hoping this will now all stop (probably not – knowing my mum!)  I have loved every moment of discovery, of following in the footsteps of my ancestors and learning how the past really has informed my present. All of the experts were generous and fascinating as they guided me back in time to introduce me to my family. Before doing Who Do You Think You Are? all I really knew about my ancestors was that they had died but now I know that they lived and how they lived. I like knowing that, I like knowing who they were and I feel very proud to be related to them.”

 

Ruth Jones
Ruth Jones

Gavin and Stacey star and co-creator Ruth Jones learns that her paternal grandfather was a key player in the Medical Aid Societies of South Wales, which provided a model for the National Health Service. She also discovers a lineage of world-travelling mariners on her mother’s side.

Ruth Jones says: “Filming Who Do You Think You Are? was one of the best experiences I’ve ever had. I feel so privileged to have been taken on this spectacular journey into my heritage and to have discovered so much about my ancestors.  I’ve probably been guilty of assuming people from by-gone generations were stuffy, two dimensional and a bit dull. But my trip on Who Do You Think You Are? has proved the opposite to be true. I feel like I’ve got to know the real people behind the fading sepia photographs and it’s made me want to find out more. Ancestry is where it’s at!”

 

This highly anticipated series of Who Do You Think You Are? will deliver laughter, tears, tragedies and shocks, as the celebrities uncover and share emotional stories and surprising revelations about family members both beloved and unknown.

 

Abigail Priddle, BBC Commissioning Editor for Specialist Factual, says: “We’re so excited about the return of Who Do You Think You Are? one of our most watched history series. Viewers have much to be excited about too, with an amazing line-up of celebrities set to delve in their ancestries and uncover lost connections and unfamiliar histories.”

 

Executive Producer for Wall to Wall, Colette Flight, says: “Who Do You Think You Are? Is back with more of our best-loved celebrities discovering incredible ancestors in their family trees. In these challenging times, the stories of courage, sacrifice and resilience they uncover are all the more resonant, but there’s also plenty of humour along the way too.”

 

The new series of Who Do You Think You Are? launches in the UK on BBC One on Monday 12th October with Jodie Whittaker’s episode.

 

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RAF Air Force Lists and thousands of extra names on War Memorials released

Disclosure: Please note this post contains affiliate links.*

 

NEWS:  Press Release from TheGenealogist

TheGenealogist has released 71 new Air Force Lists with over 2 million names, as well as 385 extra War Memorials listing over 31,000 names.

Commonwealth_Air_Aces_of_the_Second_World_War_CH3757 via wikipedia commons
Wing Commander Brendan Eamonn Fergus Finucane, DSO, DFC & Two Bars.  Public Domain

Air Force Lists

The launch of this major resource gives access to 71 new Air Force Lists from 1919 to 1945 with over 2 million searchable names.

Air Force Lists are useful for family history researchers to see when an officer joined the RAF. They can also tell you what the airman’s rank was in different years and, by looking at the letters written after his name in the list, they can tell you what medals your ancestor had been awarded. These join a large run of similar Army and Navy Lists and other military records on TheGenealogist.

Use these records to: 

      • Find ancestors who became officers in the Royal Air Force 
      • Discover their ranks, service numbers and medals awarded
      • See which branch they served in and their dates of posting

 

War Memorials

With 3,400 new photos in this release, these new records include a number of schools and colleges including the Sevenoaks School where WW1 former pupils who served are recorded as well as casualties and medals awarded to them. Other schools and colleges included in this release are: The University College School, Hampstead; Merthyr Tydfil County School; Lord Weymouth Grammar School in Warminster, Wiltshire; Leeds, St Anne’s RC School; and West Leeds High School. 

War Memorials for workplaces and sporting organisations can help flesh out an ancestor’s life in revealing their occupation or recreational pursuits. Examples include the Gloucester Rugby Club; Gloucestershire County Hall staff for WW1 WW2; the Travellers Club in Pall Mall; Leeds Council employees WW1; Leeds, Kirkstall Brewery; Leeds Stock Exchange members and clerks; London; Army & Navy Stores WW1 – memorials for two of their department stores; and London, Union Discount Co.

Rolls of Service

Included in this week’s release are also a number of Rolls of Service for the Boer War, WW1 and WW2, as well as some for civilian casualties in the Second World War such as Salcombe in Devon and Portsmouth.

This release brings the total number of War Memorials on TheGenealogist to over 597,000.

Use these records to: 

      • Find ancestors who fought for their country in various conflicts
      • Discover workplaces or organisations that some ancestors were associated with

This release expands TheGenealogist’s extensive Military records collection and when used with connected resources, such as the RAF Operations Record Books (ORBs), Aircraft Identification book from 1939, Military Death records, War Memorials and others on TheGenealogist, it can be possible to really build an ancestors story.

To see an example of this, read TheGenealogist’s article: Paddy Finucane the Spitfire Ace

These records and many more are available to Diamond subscribers of TheGenealogist.co.uk

 

About TheGenealogist

TheGenealogist is an award-winning online family history website, who put a wealth of information at the fingertips of family historians. Their approach is to bring hard to use physical records to life online with easy to use interfaces such as their Tithe and newly released Lloyd George Domesday collections. 

TheGenealogist’s innovative SmartSearch technology links records together to help you find your ancestors more easily. TheGenealogist is one of the leading providers of online family history records. Along with the standard Birth, Marriage, Death and Census records, they also have significant collections of Parish and Nonconformist records, PCC Will Records, Irish Records, Military records, Occupations, Newspaper record collections amongst many others.

TheGenealogist uses the latest technology to help you bring your family history to life. Use TheGenealogist to find your ancestors today!

These records and many more are available to Diamond subscribers of TheGenealogist.co.uk

 

 

*Disclosure: Please note this post contains affiliate links. This does not mean that you pay more just that I make a percentage on the sales from my links. The payments help me pay for the cost of running the site. You may like to read this explanation here:

http://paidforadvertising.co.uk

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The Family History Show, Online returns 26th September 2020

NEWS:

Press Release from The Family History Show, Online

The Family History Show, Online, run by Discover Your Ancestors, returns on Saturday 26th September 2020 in place of the London Family History Show for this year. Building on the huge success of the first online Family History Show in June, where over a thousand attendees enjoyed a great day, the next one is on track to be even better!

Online access means that we are all able to safely enjoy many of the usual features of the physical show from wherever we are in the world, as well as making it possible for those that have disabilities to easily attend. 

Family History Show Online

 

The Family History Show, Online will, mirroring the format of the very successful live shows, feature an online lecture theatre, the popular ‘Ask the expert’ area – where you can put questions forward to their specialists – as well as over 100 stalls where you can ask for advice as well as buy genealogical products.

Q&A Expert Session

Attendees are invited to submit questions via the website and a selection will be put forward to the panel in a multi-user Zoom session that is streamed on a linked video channel for the show.

Visit stalls and chat

To make this online experience as useful to family historians as attending the physical show would have been, you can “visit” a stall in the virtual exhibition hall. With over 100 present there will be a wide variety of societies and companies. 

Built into the website is the ability to talk to some of the stallholders by text, audio or video from the comfort of your own home. With this facility, you can ask them for advice regarding their family history society or discuss their organisation and also purchase from their online stall various downloadable and physical products to help you with your research.

Lectures

Chris Baker talks at the Family History Show Online

In the virtual lecture theatre there will be the chance to watch new talks from the same expert lecturers who would have been at the physical event and are on the ‘Ask the Expert’ panel. These presentations will cover a wide variety of family history topics from DNA to how to find family information in military records. All of these videos are subtitled.

Feedback from the last Family History Show, Online:

“The Exhibitor Hall, with the video chat and Question Feed, and details and links to their products, etc. Your show is a very close, and in some ways better, reproduction of the live event, and I’m looking forward to attending next year’s event.” Scott Barker

“I know the actual shows are great, but for us not able to get there, these online days are ideal. I put aside time to listen and it felt like a ‘day away’  from the usual routine.  Well done and thank you.” Ruth Owen

“I understand there must have been a lot of planning for the event under such tricky circumstances and it was absolutely superb in the end. Thank you very much for a really good day, your experts were helpful and I thoroughly enjoyed hearing their advice and information.” Sue Farley

Thank you so much for a great show. Learnt a lot and the experts were very interesting to listen to. Special thanks to Amelia Bennett. Looking forward to September. Keep safe”  Irene Baldock

 

Tickets to attend the next online Family History Show on 26th September 2020 are available now for just £6.00 each (£8.00 on the day). All ticket holders will also receive a digital Goody Bag worth over £10 on the day.

To find out more about The Family History Show, Online and buy your ticket visit https://thefamilyhistoryshow.com/online/

 

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TheGenealogist Doubles the number of Tithe Maps on Map Explorer™

Disclosure: Please note this post contains affiliate links.*

 

NEWS:

See Ancestors’ land or property recorded on georeferenced Tithe Maps

TheGenealogist’s Map Explorer™ which can help researchers find an ancestor’s land and view how the landscape changed over time has been augmented by the addition of georeferenced Tithe Maps for Cheshire, Dorset, Hertfordshire, Kent, Lancashire, Lincolnshire, Norfolk, Staffordshire and Yorkshire West Riding.

      • Total number of maps in this release is 3,655
      • Total number of Tithe maps in Map Explorer™ is now 6,972 
      • Map Explorer™ has over four million viewable records indicated by Map Pins
      • TheGenealogist’s Map Explorer™ displays maps for historical periods up to the modern day.

Corfe Castle map Corfe Castle mapped over the years

Map Explorer™ now features various colour and black and white Tithe maps as well as modern map base layers and historical maps which are all georeferenced to allow the user the ability to see how places change over the years. Map Explorer™ is a useful tool for browsing an ancestor’s area to find other plots that they owned or occupied, while TheGenealogist’s Master Search can be used to look for ancestors’ plots across the tithe records and then view them on Map Explorer™.

The addition to Map Explorer™ this week of the black and white tithe maps for Cheshire, Dorset, Hertfordshire, Kent, Lancashire, Lincolnshire, Norfolk, Staffordshire and Yorkshire West Riding linked to the apportionment books will enable researchers to discover ancestors who both owned or occupied property between 1837 and the 1850s, with some additional altered apportionments in later years when property was sold or divided. The records allow TheGenealogist’s Diamond subscribers to find details of the plots, the owners of the land, as well as the occupiers at the time of the survey while also identifying the actual plots on the maps. Tithes usefully record all levels of society from large estate owners to occupiers of small plots such as a homestead or a cottage. 

Map Explorer™ now features colour tithe maps for the counties of Buckinghamshire, Cumberland, Essex, Huntingdonshire, Middlesex, Northumberland, Rutland, Surrey, Westmorland, the City of York as well as North and East Ridings of Yorkshire plus black and white maps for Berkshire, Cambridge, Cheshire, Dorset, Hertfordshire, Kent, Lancashire, Leicestershire, Lincolnshire, Norfolk, Oxfordshire, Staffordshire and Yorkshire West Riding.

See TheGenealogist’s article: Tithe Maps on Map Explorer reveal more about the place ancestors lived and worked

 

Find out more at TheGenealogist.co.uk/maps/

 

About TheGenealogist

TheGenealogist is an award-winning online family history website, who put a wealth of information at the fingertips of family historians. Their approach is to bring hard to use physical records to life online with easy to use interfaces such as their Tithe and newly released Lloyd George Domesday collections. 

TheGenealogist’s innovative SmartSearch technology links records together to help you find your ancestors more easily. TheGenealogist is one of the leading providers of online family history records. Along with the standard Birth, Marriage, Death and Census records, they also have significant collections of Parish and Nonconformist records, PCC Will Records, Irish Records, Military records, Occupations, Newspaper record collections amongst many others.

TheGenealogist uses the latest technology to help you bring your family history to life. Use TheGenealogist to find your ancestors today!

 

*Disclosure: Please note this post contains affiliate links. This does not mean that you pay more just that I make a percentage on the sales from my links. The payments help me pay for the cost of running the site. You may like to read this explanation here:

http://paidforadvertising.co.uk/

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TheGenealogist releases 260,000 individuals in a new selection of Poll Book records

TheGenealogist has just released 260,000 records into its ever growing Poll Book Record Collection. This useful resource for family historians can be used to find the address of an ancestor’s residence from the period before and after the census records. The newly released Poll Books range from 1747 to 1930 and join records that also cover periods between the census years.

Poll and electoral records on TheGenealogist

The Sphere Issue No 987 December 21 1918

 

The release allows researchers to:

      • Find ancestors who had the vote
      • Discover where ancestors were registered to cast their ballot
      • See the nature of their qualification to vote, such as owning rateable property
      • Search Poll Books that range from 1747 to the 1930s

The records cover 36 different registers of people who were entitled to vote and covers constituencies situated in Bath, Devon, Hampshire, Hertford, Kent, Lincolnshire, London, Monmouthshire, Northumberland, Rutland, Scotland, Shropshire, Somerset, Staffordshire, Suffolk and Surrey.

They join the millions of electoral resources on TheGenealogist which include Electoral registers, Voters Lists and Absentee Voters.

Read TheGenealogist’s article:  Electoral Rolls Used to Locate Ancestors’ address

 

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The National Archives is open and soon will be offering greater access to collections

 

NEWS:

The Natioanl Archives logo

The National Archives (TNA) have announced that they are increasing the access to the site at Kew. After welcoming back visitors into their reading rooms in July they are now able to expand their services and increase capacity, so that they can accommodate more visitors and give them greater access to TNA’s collections.

The National Archives at Kew
The National Archives at Kew

From Tuesday 25 August The National Archives will be opening up their second floor map and large document reading room, as well as increasing the number of seats available in the first floor document reading room. Visitors will also be able to order more documents each day (nine instead of six), and TNA will also have a small number of two-day appointments available for visitors wishing to research bulk document orders (between 20 and 40).

All visitors are still required to book their visit and order their documents in advance.

The National Archives report that their building and services will look very different to regular visitors, as they’ve been busy introducing a number of measures to ensure the safety of their visitors and staff. These include:

      • New booking system to help them manage visitor numbers – all visits have to be pre-booked without exception, with a limit of one visit per week, and all documents ordered in advance
      • New document delivery processes to protect visitors and staff, and to ensure that documents are quarantined appropriately
      • One-way systems and capacity controls in frequently used areas
      • Floor markers and temporary signage to help with social distancing
      • Rigorous cleaning during and at the end of each day
      • Easier access to sinks for hand washing and provision of hand sanitiser.
      • Due to a change in the law, all visitors will be required to wear face coverings during their visit.

In order to visit TNA they are asking everyone booking a visit to agree to a new coronavirus visitor charter, aimed at encouraging all visitors to do their bit to help them ensure everyone’s safety. TNA will not permit anyone to enter the building who has not pre-booked, so please do not travel if you have not been able to book as they will not be able to let you in. The National Archives are open from Tuesday to Friday, between 10:00 and 14:50.

While they are currently able to provide access to their first floor document reading room and second floor map and large document reading room only – their other facilities will remain closed, including the reference library, exhibition spaces, shop, and the cafés. TNA say they will also be unable to provide many of their other usual reading room services, including, access to microfilm and microfiche, research advice, record copying and access to the computers.

In the current times TNA say that they will continue to provide free downloads of digital records on their website for the time being, as they are initially only able to re-open for a very limited number of researchers. This, ofcourse, and all of TNA opening arrangements are under constant review.

Read the full post on The National Archives’ website: https://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/about/news/coronavirus-update/

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Hounslow Lloyd George Domesday records added to TheGenealogist’s Map Explorer™

Disclosure: Please note this post contains affiliate links.*

 

Latest News:

TheGenealogist has just released the records of over 33,000 individuals for the Hounslow area into its property ownership and occupancy record set: The Lloyd George Domesday Survey. This is a unique online resource that includes maps and field books and gives researchers the ability to discover where an ancestor lived in the 1910-1915 period. By making use of TheGenealogist’s powerful Map Explorer the researcher can see how the landscape where their ancestor lived or worked changed over time.

The maps and residential data, in The Lloyd George Domesday Survey records are sourced from The National Archives and are being digitised by TheGenealogist so that it is possible to precisely locate where an ancestor lived on large scale, hand annotated maps. These plans include plots for the exact properties and are married to various georeferenced historical map overlays and modern base maps on the Map Explorer™. With this resource the researcher is able to thoroughly investigate the area in which an ancestor lived. 

 

      • TheGenealogist’s Lloyd George Domesday records link individual properties to extremely detailed maps used in 1910-1915
      • Fully searchable by name, county, parish and street
      • The maps will zoom down to show the individual properties as they were in the 1910s
      • The transparency slider reveals a modern street map underlay
      • Change the base map displayed to more clearly understand what the area looks like today

Hounslow records cover the areas of Bedfont, Chiswick, Cranford, Feltham, Hanworth, Heston, Isleworth, New Brentford and Old Brentford.

 

Read their article on finding the retreat of Georgiana, Duchess of Devonshire that became a “Lunatic Asylum” before the First World War and a Fire Station in World War 2 in these records:

 

About TheGenealogist

TheGenealogist is an award-winning online family history website, who put a wealth of information at the fingertips of family historians. Their approach is to bring hard to use physical records to life online with easy to use interfaces such as their Tithe and newly released Lloyd George Domesday collections. 

TheGenealogist’s innovative SmartSearch technology links records together to help you find your ancestors more easily. TheGenealogist is one of the leading providers of online family history records. Along with the standard Birth, Marriage, Death and Census records, they also have significant collections of Parish and Nonconformist records, PCC Will Records, Irish Records, Military records, Occupations, Newspaper record collections amongst many others.

TheGenealogist uses the latest technology to help you bring your family history to life. Use TheGenealogist to find your ancestors today!

 

 

*Disclosure: Please note this post contains affiliate links. This does not mean that you pay more just that I make a percentage on the sales from my links. The payments help me pay for the cost of running the site. You may like to read this explanation here:

http://paidforadvertising.co.uk/

Send to Kindle