The Nosey Genealogist's: Help Me With My Family Tree
Skip to content
Jul 15 18

Families in British India Society (FIBIS) Conference news

by Nick Thorne, The Nosey Genealogist

In the past many British people went out to India for a period, including some of my ancestors.

My grandparents in Southern India, Tea-planters in the late 1920s and 1930s

 

Thus I was very interested by news of the following:

 

FIBIS 20th anniversary conference takes place at Hawkwell House Hotel, Iffley, Oxford. Friday 28th to Sunday 30th September 2018.

This weekend conference is for both members and non-members of the Families in British India Society with an interest in the period of British involvement in India from 1600 to 1947. The varied lectures cover family and historical research topics. In this final year of the WWI centenary, the conference showcases the FIBIS project detailing recruits to WWI from the community of Anglo-Indians and domiciled Europeans, a view of the Gurkha Regiment over 200 years and advice on researching Indian Army records. Remembering 1947, there will be a lecture on Partition and Independence viewed through the contemporary newsreel and camera lens.

The Conference also considers different approaches to individual family research, from the science of DNA to the very subjective memories evoked by sharing a kitchen!

The actress Diana Quick also relates her typical Anglo-Indian family story and the research and journeys that it inspired.

Alongside the lecture programme there will be workshops and opportunities for one to one help, and time to network and compare notes with other delegates, buy books, meet the speakers and authors and join in social activities.

You can book for the conference at https://www.fibis.org/events/fibis-20th-anniversary-conference/ 

More Information https://www.fibis.org/events/fibis-20th-anniversary-conference/20th-anniversary-conference-speakers/

https://www.fibis.org/events/fibis-20th-anniversary-conference/20th-anniversary-conference-sponsors/

https://www.hawkwellhouse.co.uk/

FIBIS

Send to Kindle
Jul 8 18

The Genealogist releases another batch of Poll Books

by Nick Thorne, The Nosey Genealogist

Disclosure: Please note this post contains affiliate links.*

 

Latest news:

 

TheGenealogist has just released 116,218 records into its ever growing Poll Book Database. This useful resource for family historians can be used to find ancestors residences from the period before the census collection. The newly released Poll Books range from 1705 to the 1830s, joining records covering periods between census years.

 

The database allows researchers to:

  • Discover ancestors who had the vote
  • Find where they were registered to cast their ballot
  • Discover the nature of their qualification to vote, such as possessing a Corn Warehouse, a Workshop, a House, or owning a Brewhouse
  • These Poll Books range from 1705 to the 1830s.

 

The records cover 18 different registers of people who were entitled to vote in between 1705 and the 1830s and covers constituencies situated in Abingdon, Bristol, Hampshire, Somerset, Suffolk, Maidstone, Norfolk, Northamptonshire, Worcestershire and York.

 

These records have been transcribed by volunteers on the UKindexer.co.uk website which brings benefits to the volunteers as well as the wider family history community.

 

They join the millions of electoral resources on TheGenealogist which include Electoral registers, Voters lists and Absentee Voters.

 

Read TheGenealogist’s article: Researching Poll Books discovers how John Constable’s family voted

 

 

 

*Disclosure: Please note this post contains affiliate links. This does not mean that you pay more just that I make a percentage on the sales from my links. The payments help me pay for the cost of running the site. You may like to read this explanation here:

http://paidforadvertising.co.uk/

Send to Kindle
Jul 1 18

Maps and Plans Release from ScotlandsPeople

by Nick Thorne, The Nosey Genealogist

I read the following news with interest as when I research my Scottish ancestors a map is always useful in understanding their environment.

 

From ScotlandsPeople

More than 2,400 historic maps, plans and drawings from National Records of Scotland (NRS) collections have been made available on the ScotlandsPeople website. Many of the maps show the changing Scottish landscape over time. They also record where people lived or worked, so they can throw light on ancestors’ lives and even suggest new avenues for research. The maps and plans cover certain areas of Scotland, but not the whole of the country. They include both country estates and plans of towns and cities, including for example Glasgow. Most of the maps and plans originate in the records of court cases, Scottish government departments, Heritors’ records, as well as in private collections gifted to or purchased by NRS.

If you would like to find out more, read their maps and plans guide, or search the maps and plans.

The maps and plans collection is amongst the finest in the UK and contains the largest number of Scottish manuscript maps and plans held by any single institution. Spanning four centuries, the collections cover both manuscript and printed topographical maps and plans. They are particularly strong in estate and railway plans; architectural drawings; and engineering drawings, particularly of ships, railway engines and rolling stock. More maps and plans will be added to the ScotlandsPeople website.

Plan of the Carron River from Carron works to Grangemouth - 1797 National Records of Scotland

Plan of the Carron River from Carron works to Grangemouth, 1797
National Records of Scotland, RHP242/2

This plan of the Carron River was drawn in 1797 by John Ainslie, one of the foremost mapmakers of his time. His great map of Scotland, drawn between 1787 and 1788, was a landmark in clarifying the outline of Scotland. The River Carron is almost 14 miles in length; rising in the Campsie Fells it is shown here passing what was one of the most important industrial sites in Scotland, the Carron Works which manufactured cast iron goods, and continuing down towards Grangemouth.

 

Read more at: https://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk/article/news-article-maps-and-plans-release

Send to Kindle
Jun 22 18

Finding my ancestor in the newly released Change of Name Database

by Nick Thorne, The Nosey Genealogist

Disclosure: Please note this post contains affiliate links.*

 

TheGenealogist logo

 

This week I was taking a look around the newly released Change of Name Database on TheGenealogist so that I could put together an article for their website when I came across one of my own collateral ancestors in the database. My maternal line includes a number of fascinating Scots that would seem to have had a bit of money and land. This is stark contrast to others in my tree that had very little in the way of property.

I was thrilled, when using this new resource, to discover the official change of name where my 3x great grandmother’s elder brother was being made a baronet and officially registering a change of name from having a double-barrelled surname to a triple-barrelled one of 26 characters long!

You can read the article on Change of Names here.

 

The reason for my article was to compliment TheGenealogist releasing the new resource for family historians wanting to find ancestors who had officially changed their forename or surname in Britain. Their Change of Name Database covers information gathered from a number of sources including Private Acts of Parliament; Royal Licences published in the London and Dublin Gazettes; notices of changes of name published in The Times after 1861 with a few notices from other newspapers; registers of the Lord Lyon [King of Arms] where Scottish changes of name were commonly recorded; records in the office of the Ulster King at Arms and also some private information.

 

You can use this database to:

  • Discover ancestors that recorded a change of name
  • Find what name had been adopted and the name discarded

 

Their second release this month is to coincide with the return of The Family History Show, York to the racecourse on Saturday 23rd June, which I am attending.

TheGenealogist has now added the Colour Tithe Maps for the North Riding and the East Riding of Yorkshire. Complimenting the already released schedule books and greyscale maps, these colour maps add an attractive visual aid to find where your ancestor lived in the mid 1800s.

 

The fully searchable tithe records released online allow researchers to:

  • Find plots of land owned or occupied by ancestors in early Victorian North Riding and East Riding of Yorkshire on colour maps
  • See where your forebears lived, farmed or perhaps occupied a small cottage or a massive estate.

 

 

*Disclosure: Please note this post contains affiliate links. This does not mean that you pay more just that I make a percentage on the sales from my links. The payments help me pay for the cost of running the site. You may like to read this explanation here:

http://paidforadvertising.co.uk/

Send to Kindle
Jun 17 18

Take a trip to a Family History Show such as the one at York

by Nick Thorne, The Nosey Genealogist

Queue at York Family History Fair

Next weekend on Saturday 23rd of June 2018 there is one of the largest gathering of family historians in England taking place at The Knavesmire Exhibition Centre, The Racecourse, York, YO23 1RX.

If you are in the area then I urge you to pop along between 10am and 4.30pm and see what you may learn. I’ve been a couple of times now and found that its not just aimed at people with Yorkshire ancestors – so it is worth a visit where ever your ancestors came from.

I am already checking my tickets and planning my trip as I love attending these events for all the useful information that you can pick up from the likes of the family history society stands, genealogical suppliers and from the talks in the lecture area.

 

Click here to pre-book your tickets for The Family History Show, York and buy one get one half price!  But do hurry, as pre-booking closes at the end of Wednesday 20th June!

With even more exhibitors attending this year, the York Family History Fair is probably the largest event of its kind in England with many family history societies and companies attending each year. There is also lots of local history from the York area too.

 

Facilities include:

  • Free Talks from Expert Speakers
  • Exhibitors from all over the UK
  • Free Parking
  • Cafe with refreshments available all day
  • Fully accessible with lifts and ramps throughout

The show is organised by Discover Your Ancestors Magazine and is sponsored by TheGenealogist and S&N Genealogy Supplies.

 

Saturday 23rd June 2018 – 10am to 4.30pm

The Knavesmire Exhibition Centre, The Racecourse, York, YO23 1EX

Admission: Adults £5.00, Children under 14 FREE

https://thefamilyhistoryshow.com/york/tickets/

Send to Kindle
Jun 8 18

TheGenealogist adds more records to its new 1921 census substitute

by Nick Thorne, The Nosey Genealogist

Disclosure: Please note this post contains affiliate links.*

 

TheGenealogist logo

 

With the 1921 census still some years away from public release, TheGenealogist has added to its 1921 census substitute. This resource covers a large number of county directories which have been transcribed to produce a searchable resource. This appears under Census Records as the 1921 Census Substitute on TheGenealogist and they encompass a period currently not served by a published census. With this release the total records are boosted to 1.75 million heads of household.

The fully transcribed, searchable records released today will allow researchers to:

  • search on forename, surname and profession
  • search by street, town and county
  • look for a business name
  • discover your ancestors’ addresses
  • find professions listed

These 1921 directories cover Nottingham, Glasgow, Leicestershire & Rutland, Derby, Shropshire, Kent and add to those already released for Aberdeen, Bath, Berkshire, Bradford and Surrounding Districts, Bristol and Suburbs, Brixton and Clapham, Buckinghamshire, Cambridgeshire, Channel Islands, Cheshire, Cumberland, Dorset, Durham, Hessle, Hull, Lincolnshire, London, London County Suburbs, Middlesbrough, Norfolk, Northumberland, Oxfordshire, Somerset, Suffolk, Westmorland, Wiltshire, Worcestershire and Yorkshire. If you have ancestors that you are tracing in the 1920s then this new release from TheGenealogist adds a fantastic name rich resource for you to use.

At a time when we are celebrating the 100 years of women getting the vote we have used this newly released records to find some people with suffragette connections.

See my article here: 1920s Census Substitute Reveals the Suffragists Tea Room

 

 

*Disclosure: Please note this post contains affiliate links. This does not mean that you pay more just that I make a percentage on the sales from my links. The payments help me pay for the cost of running the site. You may like to read this explanation here:

http://paidforadvertising.co.uk/

Send to Kindle
Jun 6 18

Who Do You Think You Are? Michelle Keegan’s family tree

by Nick Thorne, The Nosey Genealogist

Michelle Keegan

Our Girl star and Coronation Street actress Michelle Keegan uncovers some exceptional women on her family tree in the episode of Who Do You Think You Are? that is on tonight, Wednesday 6th June 2018 in the U.K.

This Series fifteen of the BBC’s genealogy programme reveals shocking discoveries, laughter and tears along the way. While the rest of the episodes are due to be shown later in the summer, it begins tonight with a stand alone episode to coincide with the BBC’s ‘Hear Her’ series that celebrates the centenary of women obtaining the vote in Britain.

In this programme Michelle Keegan uncovers a special connection to suffragette leader Emmeline Pankhurst when setting out to trace her Mancunian roots. She also follows a branch of her family tree to Gibraltar and back into several generations to the north of Italy.

You can read about the discoveries in this article on TheGenealogist’s website. (Warning: article may contain spoilers.)

Who Do You Think You Are? Michelle Keegan *

 

 

*Disclosure: Please note this post contains an affiliate link. This does not mean that you pay more just that I make a percentage on the sales from my links. The payments help me pay for the cost of running the site. You may like to read this explanation here:

http://paidforadvertising.co.uk/

Send to Kindle
Jun 3 18

An Ultimate Beginners Guide to Genealogy

by Nick Thorne, The Nosey Genealogist

Just the other day I was pointed towards a Beginners Guide to Genealogy from the website: HobbyHelp.

This guide is billed as being able to help you get started with your research. It advertises that it will explain:

  • step-by-step how to organize your findings
  • which records to examine first
  • how to conduct oral histories
  • and more.

And it is FREE on the internet: https://hobbyhelp.com/genealogy/?msID=4b848189-8d56-4a9d-8312-658995c6f863

I particularly liked the author Rachel’s 5 steps to getting started as they are sensible and follow what I teach in my own English/Welsh Ancestor course

In her online guide she suggests you:

  1. Get (and stay) organized.
  2. Make a Family Tree.
  3. Consider what you want to know.
  4. Talk with your oldest living family members.
  5. Go to census records.

This is sage advice. Much of the focus of the article is towards American records, but she does also widened her horizon to include some British resources.

I also liked the excellent guidelines for conducting oral interviews with a family members that she goes into.

So if you are one of my blog readers from North America and wondering how to start family history research then this is a good place to begin before you make the leap ‘across the pond’ to trace your English or Welsh ancestors.

Hobby Help’s Genealogy Guide is here.


 

Want to find your elusive English or Welsh ancestor?

I reveal the many resources you should be using when researching your English/Welsh ancestors in my courses and great value Crib-sheets over at Family History Researcher Academy.

 

If you want a quick Cheat Sheet to discover where to look for your elusive ancestors take a look at this.

Send to Kindle
May 27 18

TheGenealogist releases Metropolitan Police Habitual Criminal Registers

by Nick Thorne, The Nosey Genealogist

Disclosure: Please note this post contains affiliate links.*

 

TheGenealogist logo

 

TheGenealogist has added to its Criminal Records collections with the release of the Metropolitan Police Criminal Records Office: Habitual Criminals Registers and the Habitual Drunkards Registers.

 

These are high quality transcripts with original colour images of the registers, as well as registers created by the Police to supervise released criminals.

One of the most interesting features of these records are the photographic portraits taken from the Registers of Habitual Drunkards. These feature two photographs – face on and profile – per individual, and some records may also give distinguishing features. The Habitual Drunkards Registers were distributed to licensed premises and the secretaries of clubs to prevent the convicted person from buying alcohol.

  • Entries contain a description of the individual and date of discharge from prison
  • Some records may also give distinguishing features of the individual
  • See face on and profile Photographs of habitual drunks.
  • It may also give the name of the prison, length of sentence and previous convictions.
  • Includes registers created by the Police to supervise released criminals including spies!

 

MEPO 6 records on TheGenealogist

All aspects of society are featured in these records on TheGenealogist.

 

These new records from The National Archive’s MEPO 6 are available as part of the Diamond Subscription at TheGenealogist.

The Criminal Records on TheGenealogist could reveal the darker side of your family tree. Read TheGenealogist’s article on Drunks and Spies in the criminal records

 

 

 

About TheGenealogist

TheGenealogist is an award-winning online family history website, who put a wealth of information at the fingertips of family historians. Their approach is to bring hard to use physical records to life online with easy to use interfaces such as their Tithe and newly released Lloyd George Domesday collections.

TheGenealogist’s innovative SmartSearch technology links records together to help you find your ancestors more easily. TheGenealogist is one of the leading providers of online family history records. Along with the standard Birth, Marriage, Death and Census records, they also have significant collections of Parish and Nonconformist records, PCC Will Records, Irish Records, Military records, Occupations, Newspaper record collections amongst many others.

TheGenealogist uses the latest technology to help you bring your family history to life. Use TheGenealogist to find your ancestors today!

About The National Archives The National Archives is one of the world’s most valuable resources for research and an independent research organisation in its own right. As the official archive and publisher for the UK government, and England and Wales they are the guardians of some of the UK’s most iconic national documents, dating back over 1,000 years. Their role is to collect and secure the future of the government record, both digital and physical, to preserve it for generations to come, and to make it as accessible and available as possible. The National Archives brings together the skills and specialisms needed to conserve some of the oldest historic documents as well as leading digital archive practices to manage and preserve government information past, present and future.

http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/  http://www.legislation.gov.uk/

For the latest stories, follow the Media Team on Twitter @TNAmediaofficer

 

 

*Disclosure: Please note this post contains affiliate links. This does not mean that you pay more just that I make a percentage on the sales from my links. The payments help me pay for the cost of running the site. You may like to read this explanation here:

http://paidforadvertising.co.uk/

Send to Kindle
May 21 18

New Website for Forces War Records and a Discount

by Nick Thorne, The Nosey Genealogist

 

Disclosure: Please note this post contains affiliate links.

 

Forces War Records have recently announced the launch of their new look website.

 

Forces War Records new website
Forces War Records – New look site

Here is the press announcement written by them:

 

Forces War Records, the website to visit for anyone researching their family’s military history or searching for ancestors through military data are excited to announce that it’s new and refreshed website is now live.

With a fresh new design and feel, the new look website gives users the opportunity to navigate through Forces War Records extensive database of military records, documents, products and services with ease. Delivering a fully responsive experience, the new website gives users a seamless transition from desktop to mobile browsing and improved searchability. Also, there’s a whole host of smaller but impactful changes, all to make your experience of the Forces War Records site that much better for you.

Visitors are able to explore the new look site by visiting https://www.forces-war-records.co.uk/ Come take a look for yourself.

We hope you like the changes, and if you have any feedback, please let us know via our Customer Services, Facebook or Twitter.

About Forces War Records.

Forces War Records (www.forces-war-records.co.uk) is the website to visit for those researching their family’s military history. Specialising only in military history, the genealogy site contains over 10+ million records of individuals who have served from medieval times – right through to the present day. This fascinating site also has a crack team of professional researchers and military experts on hand to personally uncover extra layers of history about long gone forebears. Its mission is to hold the most in-depth, accurate and helpful military records available.

Initial searches are free, but for a subscription costing, at most, £8.95 a month, users have complete, unrestricted access to Forces War Records’ data. Every time a search is made all files are cross-referenced automatically and every relevant article will appear where a particular ancestor is referenced, maybe even a photo from our historic library archive. Search results can include such information as an individual’s rank, nationality, service number, campaign medals, regiment, battalion, and promotion dates and more. (Please be aware that due to the way we collate and cross-reference our databases, some records will contain more information than that listed)

With the impending World War One Centenary in 2018 marking the 100th anniversary of the end of the First World War, Forces War Records is sure to be the first port of call for many researching the conflict and their family history.

Forces War Records Discount Code

PLEASE USE Promotional code DISCOUNT40 for 40% Discount off membership.

CLICK HERE OR IMAGE BELOW

Forces War Records deal

(off first month only, or 40% off 12 months subscription. Offer Expires: 31/12/2018)

 

 

*Disclosure: Please note this post contains affiliate links. This does not mean that you pay more just that I make a percentage on the sales from my links. The payments help me pay for the cost of running the site. You may like to read this explanation here:

http://paidforadvertising.co.uk/

Send to Kindle
%d bloggers like this: