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Mar 10 19

Speakers Announced For 2019 Family History Shows

by Nick Thorne, The Nosey Genealogist

The Family History Shows 2019

York 22nd June  –  South West 6th July  –  London 24th August

NEWS:

Expert Speakers Announced! The Family History Shows have released the details of the experts giving talks at the upcoming events. In this post we take a look at some of the speakers who will be offering free talks throughout the day at selected shows.

Don’t forget to book your tickets to The Family History Show and you can save on entry price. These events are on track to be a fantastic day out for family historians this summer. Book now before the offer ends!


South West

Tickets on the day are £6
Early Bird: Two for £8!

Buy Bristol Tickets

York

Tickets on the day are £6
Early Bird: Two for £8!

Buy York Tickets

London

Tickets on the day are £8
Early Bird: Two for £10!

Buy London Tickets

Gill Blanchard

Professional genealogist, house historian, tutor and author

Gill Blanchard has an academic background in history, sociology and politics to post-graduate level. She has been a full time researcher since 1992, including six years at Norfolk Record Office. She set up her own historical research business called Past Search in 1997, qualified as an adult education tutor the following year, and is a full member of AGRA. Gill has conducted much background research for authors, journalists and academic researchers, including the BBC Who Do You Think You Are? television series.

Gill will be speaking at the York, South West and London shows.

Debbie Kennett

DNA Expert & Author

“I am a surname researcher and genetic genealogist. I am an Honorary Research Associate in the Department of Genetics, Evolution and Environment at UCL. I am the author of two books published by the History Press: ‘The Surnames Handbook’ (2012) and ‘DNA and Social Networking’ (2011).”

Debbie will be speaking at the York and South West shows.

Jayne Shrimpton

Fashion historian and photo dating expert

Jayne Shrimpton MA, a trained, professional dress historian and photographs/artworks specialist has dated and interpreted numerous family pictures over a career spanning 30 years. She writes regular articles for Discover Your Ancestors and other genealogy magazines, is the author of seven books, and is a picture consultant on the TV series Who Do You Think You Are?

Jayne will be speaking at the York and London shows.

Chris Baker

Military Historian & Author

“Over the years many people have asked me for help in researching a soldier. I initially did this as a hobby, but with so many people asking and me being busy at work, something had to give. I decided to make a living out of my passion and left my old career behind on 25 April 2008. I now work full time on writing, researching and touring. My business FourteenEighteen | Research is always bursting at the seams; in all, I have completed research of well over 8000 soldiers.”

Chris will be speaking at the London and South West shows.

Keith Gregson

Sport and Social Historian & Author

Keith Gregson has been writing for over 40 years, including many family history books and contributions to popular magazines including Discover Your Ancestors. In his talk at The Family History Show, Keith shares his top tips & techniques for finding elusive ancestors, illustrated by some fascinating case studies.

Keith will be speaking at the York show.

 

This is what the organisers say:

What will be available?

Each show will have two lecture areas with Free Talks given by various expert independent speakers including Photo Dating Expert and Fashion Historian Jayne Shrimpton, DNA Expert Debbie Kennett and others we have lined up and will announce in later emails and on our Facebook page.

The extremely popular face to face Free ‘Ask the Experts’ section will be run at all of the Discover Your Ancestors Family History Shows this year. We’re also expanding this area to cover your questions on DNA, Dating Photographs, Medals, Military Service and Research Problems. So don’t forget to bring your ancestors’ medals, records and photos along!

New for the 2019 shows we are also introducing Q&A panel sessions, where you can get your family history queries answered by a group of experts. So make sure you have time to ask those family history questions when planning your day.

With over 100 tables already booked, space is filling up fast! If you or anyone you know may be interested in exhibiting you can find out more on our bookings page.

We are making The Family History Shows affordable events to attend with low-cost entry, Free Talks and Free Parking. Book your tickets now to avoid disappointment.

Keep up with our latest announcements for all our shows on Twitter and Facebook.

 

I hope to be at all three shows this year. Putting the dates in the diary now!

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Mar 3 19

My Top Family History Map resources

by Nick Thorne, The Nosey Genealogist

I’ve been looking for where some ancestors lived this week and it was to historic maps of all sorts that I have turned in my quest to understand a bit more about the area that they lived and worked within during the period that they were alive.

Some of the areas in the towns have been “extensively remodelled” by a combination of Blitz bombing and modern town planners and so the roads have disappeared.

Here is a video that I put together a couple of years ago but it is still relevant today!

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Feb 23 19

Kensington & Chelsea 1910 Lloyd George Domesday Records with maps

by Nick Thorne, The Nosey Genealogist

Disclosure: Please note this post contains affiliate links.*

 

 

Latest News:

 

 

Kensington & Chelsea 1910 Valuation Office (Lloyd George Domesday) Records with maps added online

   

Map Showing the areas covered in this latest release (red) and current total coverage (green)

TheGenealogist is releasing the field books and detailed annotated maps for Kensington and Chelsea as the next part of this exciting record set, The Lloyd George Domesday Survey – a resource that can be used to find where an ancestor lived in 1910. Covering the areas of Brompton, Chelsea East, Chelsea West, Holland Park, Notting Hill East, Notting Hill West and South Kensington the newly added records contain 49,608 individuals who owned or occupied property in this upmarket part of London.

This unique online combination of detailed maps and residential data held by The National Archives is being digitised by TheGenealogist and can locate where your ancestor’s house had been on large scale (5 feet to the mile) hand annotated maps which show the outlines of property plots.

Beatrix Potter’s childhood home at 2 Bolton Gardens, Kensington

 

Details of the Potter’s lavish family home, including 6 bedrooms, 2 dressing rooms, 3 WCs and a servants hall

 

Previously, researchers would often not be able to find where ancestors lived for several reasons. Road names changed over time, the Blitz saw areas bombed to destruction, developers changed sites out of all resemblance from what had stood there before and lanes and roads were extinguished to build estates and office blocks. All this means that searching for where an ancestor lived using a website linked to modern maps can be frustrating when they fail to pinpoint where the old properties had once been.

  • TheGenealogist’s new release will link individual properties to extremely detailed ordnance survey maps used in 1910
  • Locate an address found in a census or street directory down to a specific house
  • Fully searchable by name, county, parish and street.
  • The maps will zoom down to show individual properties on roads as they existed in 1910

Complementing the maps on TheGenealogist are the accompanying field books that will also provide researchers with information relative to the valuation of each property, including the valuation assessment number, map reference, owner, occupier, situation, description and extent.

This huge project includes over 94,500 Field Books, each having hundreds of pages to digitise with associated large scale IR121 annotated OS maps, and is therefore ongoing.

The initial releases from TheGenealogist have begun in London and will continue to expand outwards across the country with cross linked maps wherever they are available.

Find out more at: TheGenealogist.co.uk/1910Survey/

Or read the feature article: Kensington and Chelsea Lloyd George Domesday Survey finds famous authors and actors

 

 

 

*Disclosure: Please note this post contains affiliate links. This does not mean that you pay more just that I make a percentage on the sales from my links. The payments help me pay for the cost of running the site. You may like to read this explanation here:

http://paidforadvertising.co.uk

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Feb 17 19

Why is my ancestor missing from the births/baptisms?

by Nick Thorne, The Nosey Genealogist

looking for english ancestors birth records

If you find that your ancestor is missing from the Civil Registration records what do you do next?

I was asked this question over the weekend by a family history researcher who had discovered that his ancestor appeared in a census as a very young child in the 1860s.

The problem was that the baby’s civil registration and baptism records was frustratingly missing. The census provided a date, 1860, and a place where the person had been born, but a search of all the subscription sites as well as FamilySearch and the General Register Office website drew a blank.

 

If you have a similar research problem then this is my advice:

  • It is possible that the parents may have changed the child’s name in between registering it and the time of the census in 1861. Therefore think about searching for just the surname and the town of birth in the relevant year to see if you find a likely contender.
  • Did the child miss being registered? It is thought that up to 15% of children were not registered at all. If your ancestor had siblings check to see if they were registered as this may point to whether the family were able to keep under the radar of the authorities. Registration was only made compulsory from 1875 and the onus was then on parents to go and inform the local registrar, before this date it was the registrar who collected the details.
  • My best guess is that the civil registration actually did take place, but that the registrar simply got it wrong and recorded the name incorrectly. I always try to think of what alternative names could have been used. If you think your ancestor is a Josiah, look also for Joshua, John, Joseph, Isaiah etc.
  • With regard to baptism, consider if the parents have had the child baptised in a nearby parish? (Look for a contiguous parish in Phillimore’s or use the mapping tool on FamilySearch.
  • If it was different. perhaps they went to the Parish Church associated with the mother’s parish. Check where she had been from before she married.
  • Another thing to consider was that the child was baptised by a nonconformist minister – they often held on to their own registers and when they moved from one chapel in one town to another they could have taken the register with them. This would mean that it may not be where you would expect it to be!

Happy researching!

 

If you are interested in discovering more about where to research for your English or Welsh family history, then my course is a great way to learn more: www.FamilyHistoryResearcher.com/course

 

Online English & Welsh family history course

Family History Researcher Academy Online English & Welsh family history course

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Feb 10 19

World War II Casualty Lists reveal executed Motor Racing drivers

by Nick Thorne, The Nosey Genealogist

I was asked to write an article to go with the release of a new set of records over at TheGenealogist.

The record set adds to TheGenealogist’s Military Records collection with the release of more than 1 million entries for people recorded in the Second World War Casualty Lists. Sourced from collection WO 417 held at The National Archives, these documents contain records from the war years of 1939 to 1945 and list casualties sustained by the British Army during the Second World War. There are volumes for Officers and Nurses, with separate volumes for Other Ranks. The Casualty Lists were compiled from daily lists that had been prepared by the War Office Casualty Section and cover the various expeditionary forces deployed in different locations across Europe, Africa and Asia as well as for personnel at home.

WW2 Casualty Records will give family history researchers details of ancestors’ names and regiment as well as ranks and service numbers for those recorded. The World War 2 casualty lists contained more detail than their WW1 counterparts and often list the date of the casualty (as well as the list date), plus other information such as the unit a soldier had been serving in at the time.

British Casualty Lists

DF3M83 The image from the Nazi Propaganda! depicts captured English soldiers in Libya, published on 4 August 1942. Place unknown. Photo: Berliner Verlag/Archiv

Included in these lists are those who had been unaccounted for by the military, been dangerously ill or injured, captured as a Prisoner of War or died. The records include troops who had been serving in a number of places across the world, but also cover personnel who had lost their lives, were injured at home or were serving at an overseas station outside the theatres of war. Updates and corrections appear in the records as new information was received by the War Office.

 

These records allow a researcher to use TheGenealogist’s unique SmartSearch by simply clicking the magnifying glass at the bottom of the transcript. This will automatically search for any other records relating to that person. For example, if they were a Prisoner of War this will return other records from TheGenealogist’s military collection, including PoW records that reveal what camp that soldier had been recorded in.

 

If a person had died, you also get a smart link to the Commonwealth War Graves Commission (CWGC) which brings up details of their war grave, with further information.

 

Use the WWII casualty list records to:

  • Find ancestors who were Missing, Wounded, Killed in Action or Prisoners of War
  • Discover army personnel seriously ill or accidentally killed serving at home or overseas
  • Check an ancestor’s rank and service number
  • Find the theatre of war in which your ancestor was serving when they became a casualty

 

Read my article for TheGenealogist: WWII Casualty Lists finds two motor racing aces executed by the Nazis   (Affiliate link)

 

*Disclosure: Please note this post contains affiliate links. This does not mean that you pay more just that I make a percentage on the sales from my links. The payments help me pay for the cost of running the site. You may like to read this explanation here: http://paidforadvertising.co.uk

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Feb 3 19

Five tips for finding your British military history

by Nick Thorne, The Nosey Genealogist

Something a little different today!

Here is a video that I put together on finding British Military ancestors:

 

In this video we’re going to look at five tips for discovering your English or Welsh military ancestors. There are many military collections online and they range from such things as the early Muster lists for the Militia to medal collections from First World War and Second World War. Some Service Records and Prisoner of War  (POW) records etcetera.

The first record set that I’d like to draw your attention to is the First World War Casualty Lists. See them on Findmypast and also the fascinating resource that is the Casualty List records on TheGenelaogist.co.uk. In some cases they actually show you the printed page from the newspaper of the time that was informing the the poor people at home about what had happened to their service folk.

Second tip is to look out for war Diaries at the National Archives (TNA). Some of these are now appearing on the ancestry subscription site, but others you will need to go to the TNA for – or their website and pay to have a record copied and then sent to you.

Tip number three  – if you’re looking for your ancestors from the Second World War in the British Army the Royal Navy or the Royal Air Force then you need to visit the website page of veterans UK and there you can request a summary of service record from 1920 up to the present time. See: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/requests-for-personal-data-and-service-records

Fourth tip: The National Archives holds service records prior to that date and following on from that the fourth tip is if you’re looking for an officer in the Royal Air Force and think of looking at the RAF confidential list in Air 10 series at the National Archives. From 1939 the Air Ministry realized that publishing the Regular Air Force lists with details of an officer’s postings provided useful intelligence for the enemy about new squadrons bases and aircraft so they split the list into two. One recorded the ranks and seniority of officers as it always had done and another one gave the details of the stations and this particular set of lists were called the RAF confidential list and were distributed on a strictly controlled basis so if you’ve already obtained your RAF ancestors service record then of course this will give you a list of stations or units using numbers and all initials which can then be used in conjunction with the Confidential list. Unfortunately these are not online so you’ll either need to pay a visit to the National Archives in Kew, Surrey or select the record and ask them for a quote to copy it and to send it to you.

Tip number five is not all of our servicemen would have been serving in the British Army some served in the British Indian Army. I had a client who transferred out of the regular British Army into the Indian Army and his records are available from the British Library and so you need to either pay them a visit in person, or you need to contact them and ask them for a quote for copying the record and then posting it on to you. Just consider that if your army personnel aren’t showing up in the British Army check out the British Indian army and their records available from the British Library.

To find out more about how to tease out your elusive English or Welsh ancestors go now to www.noseygenealogist.com/discover

discover thank you for watching

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Jan 27 19

Prisoner Records reveal a criminal lunatic who threatened Queen Victoria

by Nick Thorne, The Nosey Genealogist

Disclosure: Please note this post contains affiliate links.*

 
Latest News: 
TheGenealogist is adding to its Court and Criminal Records collection with the release of almost 700,000 entries for prisoners. Sourced from the HO 8 Registers held by The National Archives, these documents contain records from the years 1821 to 1876. This expands our collection to over 1.3 million individuals covering 1801-1876.

Central Criminal Court, Old Bailey

 
These Prison Registers give family history researchers details of ancestors who were imprisoned in a number of convict prisons from Broadmoor to the Warrior Convict Hulk. The records reveal the names of prisoners, offences the prisoner had been convicted for, the date of their trial and where they were tried.  

Use the quarterly prison registers to:
  • Find ancestors guilty of crimes ranging from theft, highway robbery and libel to murder
  • Discover the sentences received
  • See the age of a prisoner
  • Find out where they were sentenced and to which prison they were sent
  Read TheGenealogist’s article, “A child poisoner and a criminal lunatic detained at Her Majesty’s pleasure”.

*Disclosure: Please note this post contains affiliate links. This does not mean that you pay more just that I make a percentage on the sales from my links. The payments help me pay for the cost of running the site. You may like to read this explanation here: http://paidforadvertising.co.uk
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Jan 20 19

Those aren’t my ancestors

by Nick Thorne, The Nosey Genealogist

Break Down Your Family History Brick Walls

We all love it when we have identified a new ancestor and can then add them to our family tree to fill that annoying gap that once blighted our research. The sense of satisfaction to jump back one more generation can sometimes blind us, if only for a second. Unfortunately it can be for longer!

All to often we can be lead down the wrong path by spotting a person with the same name as the one we are seeking. By adding this likely person into our family tree, and then researching back from them, we have effectively grafted on to our own tree a branch of someone else’s which has no real right to be there.

I almost got caught out with one of my own ancestors who was responsible for a long standing brick wall of mine. I had already identified the marriage of this individual in a Plymouth church in 1794. From the parish register entry I had her name and that she was “of this parish”. Naturally I hoped that I could find her baptism and then the marriage of her parents and so go back through the generations in the city. Sadly, in this instance, when she declared she was of the parish it meant little more than that she was living there at the time. In a place, such as Plymouth, we have to be aware that such a conurbation would have attracted people in from the surrounding towns and countryside, as well as by sea.

 

Nick Thorne 'The Nosey Genealogist' researching for FamilyHistoryResearcher.com

 

I worked out a possible birth range from her marriage and searched Plymouth with no joy. I then widened the search to the whole of the county and was rewarded with a person with the correct name being born in North Devon. At this point I experienced the rush associated with the belief that I was on her trail! Unfortunately, by checking for marriages in the area, I found that this woman married someone else a year after my own ancestor with the same name married in Plymouth.

 

The fact that our ancestors were happy to chose from a small pool of forenames makes family history research harder and so anything that can make things easier for us should be welcomed. Or should it?

I am referring to the temptation to take a suggestion from an online family tree, or these days the clever matching software that online data websites boast, and simply click to add the suggested person to our tree without checking the evidence backs us up. Some people say that we should aim to find two or more sources as evidence for a particular fact. I read that Else Churchill of the Society of Genealogist has said that she believes that it’s the quality not quantity of your evidence that counts. This I think is very sound advice. So look at the facts and decide how much weight you truly can give to it before adding it to your family tree.

 

To learn more about tracing your English or Welsh family History you may be interested in my online course:

www.FamilyHistoryResearcher.com/course

 

www.familyhistoryresearcher.com

 

www.FamilyHistoryResearcher.com/course

 

 

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Jan 13 19

More than 144,700 Worcestershire Baptism records added to TheGenealogist and a further 20,000 individuals on Headstones

by Nick Thorne, The Nosey Genealogist

Disclosure: Please note this post contains affiliate links.*

Latest News

TheGenealogist is releasing the records of 144,793 individuals added to their Worcestershire Baptisms (in Partnership with Malvern FHS) and an additional 20,000 individuals on headstones from the UKIndexer project where volunteers help their fellow genealogists by indexing and/or photographing the monumental inscriptions in churchyards and cemeteries.

 

  • Discover dates of ancestors’ baptisms
  • Glean names of parents of those baptised in Worcestershire
  • Headstones give dates and name details of those buried and sometimes familiar relationships
  • Memorials can reveal information not recorded elsewhere for ancestors

St Giles church at Imber

St Giles, Imber

 

Headstones being released this week includes the transcriptions and the images for those at St Giles, Imber on Salisbury Plain, useful for those with ancestors buried there as it is only open a few days a year. St Giles’ Church is in the deserted village of Imber, Wiltshire and was built in the late 13th or early 14th century. The village falls within the British Army’s training grounds on Salisbury Plain and is deserted as a result of the entire civilian population being evicted in 1943 to provide an exercise area for American troops preparing for the invasion of Europe during the Second World War. Once the war came to an end the villagers would have liked to return but were not allowed. The church today is without its pews and its font was moved to Brixton Deverill while the pulpit has been sent to Winterbourne Stoke. St Giles’ seating, bell and two effigies are now housed at Edington Priory. The Church of St Giles is open for visitors and services on specified days of the year when the Ministry of Defence allows access. St Giles is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a Grade I listed building, and is now a redundant church in the care of the Churches Conservation Trust.

 

These fully searchable records released this week are available now to Diamond subscribers of TheGenealogist.

 

Read their article: TheGenealogist adds to its Headstone collection to reveal some fascinating celebrities

 

 

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List of churchyards and burial grounds in this release

Bedfordshire: Lidlington Graveyard, Lidlington; St Andrew, Ampthill; St Lawrence, Wymington Buckinghamshire: St Leonard, Chesham Bois Devon: St Clement, Powderham; All Saints, Kenton Dorset: St Andrew, Fontmell Magna; St Aldhelms, Upton; Church of the Ascension, Woodlands; St Wolfrida, Horton; Sherborne Abbey, Sherborne; St Mary Magdalene, Fifehead Magdalen; St Nicholas, Edmondsham; St Gregory, Marnhull; All Saints, Chalbury; St Laurence, Farnham; St Peter, Pimperne; Holy Trinity, Stourpaine; St Mary, Iwerne Minster; All Saints, Kington Magna Essex: North Road Burial Ground, Westcliff-on-Sea Gloucestershire: St Barnabas, Snowshill; St Peter, Daylesford; Hailes Parish Church, Hailes; St Mary, Driffield; Hampshire: All Saints, Minstead Herefordshire: St Peter and St Paul, Weobley Lincolnshire: St Paul, Morton, Gainsborough London: St Pauls Burial Ground now West Hackney Recreation Ground, Hackney North Yorkshire: St John and All Saints, Easingwold; St John the Evangelist Catholic Church, Easingwold; Christ Church Cemetery, Marton cum Grafton Northamptonshire: St Mary’s Rushden, Rushden; Rushden Cemetery, Rushden; All Saints, Earls Barton; Earls Barton Baptist Church, Earls Barton Oxfordshire: St Mary, Swinbrook Shropshire: St Catherine, Eyton on the Weald Moors; St Cuthbert’s Donington, Albrighton, Wolverhampton; St Bartholomew, Tong Somerset: St John the Baptist, Biddisham; St Nicholas, Brockley; Sawbridgeworth Cemetery, Sawbridgeworth; St Lawrence, Rode; St Lawrence, Cucklington; St Nicholas, Henstridge Suffolk: St Mary, Grundisburgh Wiltshire: St Editha, Baverstock; St Martin, Barford St Martin; St Margaret of Antioch, Corsley; Christ Church, Warminster; Holy Trinity, Bradford on Avon; Baptist Burial Ground, Crockerton; St Leonard, Sutton Veny; St Peter Ad Vincula, Tollard Royal; St Aldhelm, Bishopstrow; Holy Trinity, Dilton Marsh; Christ Church, Bradford on Avon; St Giles, Imber; St John, Warminster; St John the Baptist, Bishopstone Worcestershire: St Eadburgha, Broadway Yorkshire: New Connexion, Shepley, Huddersfield; St Pauls, Shepley, Huddersfield; St Thomas, Thurstonland; St Lucius, Farnley Tyas; Christ Church, New Mill, Holmfirth

 

List of Worcestershire Parishes

Beoley, Birtsmorton, Clent, Cradley Nr Ledbury, Ripple, Severn Stoke, St. Peter The Great, Tenbury Wells, Upper Arley, Upton On Severn, Upton Upon Severn, White Ladies Aston, Whittington, Wolverley, Worcester All Saints, Worcester St Albans, Worcester St Clement, Worcester St Clements, Worcester St Helen, Worcester St John Of Bedwardine, Worcester St Martin, Worcester St Michael, Worcester St Nicholas, Worcester, St Swithun, Worcester St. Helen, Wribbenhall, Wyre Piddle

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Jan 6 19

General Register Office prices rise in February 2019

by Nick Thorne, The Nosey Genealogist

For family history researchers, as in every other field, price rises are inevitable even if unwelcome when on a tight budget. I have always recommended in my course that researchers buy the relevant birth, marriage or death certificate and continue to do so. This is because these copy documents help to make sure that researcher get access to the important information contained on them and to be as sure as we can be that we are adding the correct person into our family tree. Even with the increase in certificate prices that The General Register Office (GRO) has announced, I still stand by that advice.

To be fair, to this government department, this is the first increase in certificate costs since 2010 and so it may be said that it is only to be expected.

 

Copy wedding certificate arrives in post

 

From the 16th February 2019 we now know that the cost of print certificates will increase from £9.25 to £11, and from £23.40 to £35 for the priority service, which provides delivery on the next working day. The same costs will also apply if family history researchers order the certificate from their local register office.

In October 2017 the GRO had introduced a pilot scheme which allowed researchers to order PDF copies of the digitised birth and death records for £6 each. This scheme was a success and after an estimated 79,600 PDF orders rolled in to the GRO in three months, they extended the scheme indefinitely.

The cost of PDF records will also see a rise this February as they now increase to £7 each, with priority deliveries available at £45.

A new charge is also being introduced for researchers who make an application to the GRO for a certificate copy without knowing the index reference. While this has not been charged for to date, there will now be an additional non-refundable fee of £3 in exchange for GRO staff carrying out a search of the index.  Also the GRO will require a fee of £3.50 where they cannot fulfil an order because the staff cannot locate the record with the information provided by the researcher.

Ancestor's wedding certificate

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